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137846| Oryon Develop| Webinar: The Ageing Spine - From Cradle to Grave|

An estimated 90% of the population will experience neck or back pain during their lifetime. However, for certain people, back pain can become chronic and disabling.

 

With the success of the face-to-face event in February 2022, we are pleased to be welcoming back Mr Caspar Aylott to deliver this talk as a webinar. For those who were unable to attend in person, here is your chance to learn about The Ageing Spine.

 

Consultant Spine Surgeon, Mr Caspar Aylott, will be discussing the engaging journey of the spine. Mr Aylott's stance on his patients is that surgery is the last resort and conservative treatments are effective in more than 90% of the patients he sees.

 

Speaker: Mr Caspar Aylott, Consultant Spine Surgeon

What's included:

Live 2-hour group learning webinar, speaker's slides (if permitted), CPD certificate, and recording of the course (even if you can't make it to the live event).

Price: £39 + VAT

137838| Multiple Locations| Membrane Filtration Technologies|

This module runs each September and in September 2022 it is part funded by the European Social Fund through the Welsh Government: in September 2022 it is only open to applicants who work OR live in Wales. From September 2023 it is open to all applicants, regardless of where they live and work, but the fee will be £850.

Reduce “waste” and recover water by refining your by-products

Adding value to liquid ‘waste’ - get up to speed with using low cost membrane technologies to manage and add value to liquid ‘waste’ from agriculture, and the food and drink industries. This module will be of value to any business with a product or waste product needing decontamination or constituent separation. This could be anything from separating clean water from farm slurry through to removing pulp from fruit juice or fractionating milk. This module will be of interest to food processors, land managers and farm advisers.

This module is delivered by Swansea University's College of Engineering and does involve the use of maths, however, one-to-one maths help sessions are available if needed.

The course will consist of a series of lectures and guided learning focused on:

List of Units

An Introduction to membrane technology

An overview of membrane technology and a look at the basic concepts and applications

Membrane morphology and fabrication

How membranes are made and how they work

Fouling and cake filtration

what happens when a membrane becomes clogged

Microfiltration

Introduction and overview of microfiltration and its applications e.g for separating high-quality whey protein in milk products; or microbial removal.

Ultrafiltration

Introduction and overview of ultrafiltration and a look at charge effects e.g. for reduction of contaminant loads in waste water

Nanofiltration

Introduction to nanofiltration; the characteristics of a nanofiltration membrane and applications e.g. demineralization in dairy processing

WORKSHOP

Use pilot scale equipment to characterise a liquid of your choice and build a membrane filtration system to separate constituent parts. Participants will:

  1. Plan a filtration experiment
  2. Apply mathematical models to predict membrane flux
  3. Prepare and perform a filtration
  4. Analyse the filtrate for membrane efficiency

Reverse osmosis

Introduction to reverse osmosis and its applications e.g. to produce drinking water from contaminated water

Reverse osmosis; energy recovery and fouling

optimising membrane efficiency

137840| Multiple Locations| Membrane Filtration Technologies|

This module runs each September and in September 2022 it is part funded by the European Social Fund through the Welsh Government: in September 2022 it is only open to applicants who work OR live in Wales. From September 2023 it is open to all applicants, regardless of where they live and work, but the fee will be £850.

Reduce “waste” and recover water by refining your by-products

Adding value to liquid ‘waste’ - get up to speed with using low cost membrane technologies to manage and add value to liquid ‘waste’ from agriculture, and the food and drink industries. This module will be of value to any business with a product or waste product needing decontamination or constituent separation. This could be anything from separating clean water from farm slurry through to removing pulp from fruit juice or fractionating milk. This module will be of interest to food processors, land managers and farm advisers.

This module is delivered by Swansea University's College of Engineering and does involve the use of maths, however, one-to-one maths help sessions are available if needed.

The course will consist of a series of lectures and guided learning focused on:

List of Units

An Introduction to membrane technology

An overview of membrane technology and a look at the basic concepts and applications

Membrane morphology and fabrication

How membranes are made and how they work

Fouling and cake filtration

what happens when a membrane becomes clogged

Microfiltration

Introduction and overview of microfiltration and its applications e.g for separating high-quality whey protein in milk products; or microbial removal.

Ultrafiltration

Introduction and overview of ultrafiltration and a look at charge effects e.g. for reduction of contaminant loads in waste water

Nanofiltration

Introduction to nanofiltration; the characteristics of a nanofiltration membrane and applications e.g. demineralization in dairy processing

WORKSHOP

Use pilot scale equipment to characterise a liquid of your choice and build a membrane filtration system to separate constituent parts. Participants will:

  1. Plan a filtration experiment
  2. Apply mathematical models to predict membrane flux
  3. Prepare and perform a filtration
  4. Analyse the filtrate for membrane efficiency

Reverse osmosis

Introduction to reverse osmosis and its applications e.g. to produce drinking water from contaminated water

Reverse osmosis; energy recovery and fouling

optimising membrane efficiency

137839| Multiple Locations| Membrane Filtration Technologies|

This module runs each September and in September 2022 it is part funded by the European Social Fund through the Welsh Government: in September 2022 it is only open to applicants who work OR live in Wales. From September 2023 it is open to all applicants, regardless of where they live and work, but the fee will be £850.

Reduce “waste” and recover water by refining your by-products

Adding value to liquid ‘waste’ - get up to speed with using low cost membrane technologies to manage and add value to liquid ‘waste’ from agriculture, and the food and drink industries. This module will be of value to any business with a product or waste product needing decontamination or constituent separation. This could be anything from separating clean water from farm slurry through to removing pulp from fruit juice or fractionating milk. This module will be of interest to food processors, land managers and farm advisers.

This module is delivered by Swansea University's College of Engineering and does involve the use of maths, however, one-to-one maths help sessions are available if needed.

The course will consist of a series of lectures and guided learning focused on:

List of Units

An Introduction to membrane technology

An overview of membrane technology and a look at the basic concepts and applications

Membrane morphology and fabrication

How membranes are made and how they work

Fouling and cake filtration

what happens when a membrane becomes clogged

Microfiltration

Introduction and overview of microfiltration and its applications e.g for separating high-quality whey protein in milk products; or microbial removal.

Ultrafiltration

Introduction and overview of ultrafiltration and a look at charge effects e.g. for reduction of contaminant loads in waste water

Nanofiltration

Introduction to nanofiltration; the characteristics of a nanofiltration membrane and applications e.g. demineralization in dairy processing

WORKSHOP

Use pilot scale equipment to characterise a liquid of your choice and build a membrane filtration system to separate constituent parts. Participants will:

  1. Plan a filtration experiment
  2. Apply mathematical models to predict membrane flux
  3. Prepare and perform a filtration
  4. Analyse the filtrate for membrane efficiency

Reverse osmosis

Introduction to reverse osmosis and its applications e.g. to produce drinking water from contaminated water

Reverse osmosis; energy recovery and fouling

optimising membrane efficiency

137842| Multiple Locations| Membrane Filtration Technologies|

This module runs each September and in September 2022 it is part funded by the European Social Fund through the Welsh Government: in September 2022 it is only open to applicants who work OR live in Wales. From September 2023 it is open to all applicants, regardless of where they live and work, but the fee will be £850.

Reduce “waste” and recover water by refining your by-products

Adding value to liquid ‘waste’ - get up to speed with using low cost membrane technologies to manage and add value to liquid ‘waste’ from agriculture, and the food and drink industries. This module will be of value to any business with a product or waste product needing decontamination or constituent separation. This could be anything from separating clean water from farm slurry through to removing pulp from fruit juice or fractionating milk. This module will be of interest to food processors, land managers and farm advisers.

This module is delivered by Swansea University's College of Engineering and does involve the use of maths, however, one-to-one maths help sessions are available if needed.

The course will consist of a series of lectures and guided learning focused on:

List of Units

An Introduction to membrane technology

An overview of membrane technology and a look at the basic concepts and applications

Membrane morphology and fabrication

How membranes are made and how they work

Fouling and cake filtration

what happens when a membrane becomes clogged

Microfiltration

Introduction and overview of microfiltration and its applications e.g for separating high-quality whey protein in milk products; or microbial removal.

Ultrafiltration

Introduction and overview of ultrafiltration and a look at charge effects e.g. for reduction of contaminant loads in waste water

Nanofiltration

Introduction to nanofiltration; the characteristics of a nanofiltration membrane and applications e.g. demineralization in dairy processing

WORKSHOP

Use pilot scale equipment to characterise a liquid of your choice and build a membrane filtration system to separate constituent parts. Participants will:

  1. Plan a filtration experiment
  2. Apply mathematical models to predict membrane flux
  3. Prepare and perform a filtration
  4. Analyse the filtrate for membrane efficiency

Reverse osmosis

Introduction to reverse osmosis and its applications e.g. to produce drinking water from contaminated water

Reverse osmosis; energy recovery and fouling

optimising membrane efficiency

137844| Multiple Locations| Membrane Filtration Technologies|

This module runs each September and in September 2022 it is part funded by the European Social Fund through the Welsh Government: in September 2022 it is only open to applicants who work OR live in Wales. From September 2023 it is open to all applicants, regardless of where they live and work, but the fee will be £850.

Reduce “waste” and recover water by refining your by-products

Adding value to liquid ‘waste’ - get up to speed with using low cost membrane technologies to manage and add value to liquid ‘waste’ from agriculture, and the food and drink industries. This module will be of value to any business with a product or waste product needing decontamination or constituent separation. This could be anything from separating clean water from farm slurry through to removing pulp from fruit juice or fractionating milk. This module will be of interest to food processors, land managers and farm advisers.

This module is delivered by Swansea University's College of Engineering and does involve the use of maths, however, one-to-one maths help sessions are available if needed.

The course will consist of a series of lectures and guided learning focused on:

List of Units

An Introduction to membrane technology

An overview of membrane technology and a look at the basic concepts and applications

Membrane morphology and fabrication

How membranes are made and how they work

Fouling and cake filtration

what happens when a membrane becomes clogged

Microfiltration

Introduction and overview of microfiltration and its applications e.g for separating high-quality whey protein in milk products; or microbial removal.

Ultrafiltration

Introduction and overview of ultrafiltration and a look at charge effects e.g. for reduction of contaminant loads in waste water

Nanofiltration

Introduction to nanofiltration; the characteristics of a nanofiltration membrane and applications e.g. demineralization in dairy processing

WORKSHOP

Use pilot scale equipment to characterise a liquid of your choice and build a membrane filtration system to separate constituent parts. Participants will:

  1. Plan a filtration experiment
  2. Apply mathematical models to predict membrane flux
  3. Prepare and perform a filtration
  4. Analyse the filtrate for membrane efficiency

Reverse osmosis

Introduction to reverse osmosis and its applications e.g. to produce drinking water from contaminated water

Reverse osmosis; energy recovery and fouling

optimising membrane efficiency

137830| Multiple Locations| Precision Livestock|

This module runs each September and in September 2022 it is part funded by the European Social Fund through the Welsh Government: in September 2022 it is only open to applicants who work OR live in Wales. From September 2023 it is open to all applicants, regardless of where they live and work, but the fee will be £850.

Learn how technology can improve resource management in livestock production

Precision livestock farming provides continuous automated real-time data to help monitor and manage livestock production at an individual level. This module introduces the latest precision technologies and looks at how these can be used to improve monitoring and benchmarking within intensive and extensive livestock systems. We will also explore the potential for these technologies to improve biosecurity, traceability and reduce losses from the wider supply system.

Want a sneak preview of Unit 1 of this module right now? Join our free open access trial here

List of Units

Introduction: A brief overview of precision technologies past and present

The challenges that precision livestock technologies can solve: Strengths and limitations of precision technologies for producers

Research on current technologies: Novel uses for current technologies, a look at current research into the benefits of certain technologies

Future technologies: Concepts and ideas

Identifying relevant technologies: Look at the research, validation, design and development of new technologies

Transferring technologies between sectors

Utilising outputs: How different actors within a supply system can utilise outputs from precision technologies

Uptake and continuity of new technologies: From early adopters, to jumping the gap, to mainstream

Case Studies: Using case studies to identify how precision technology can be used

137834| Multiple Locations| Precision Livestock|

This module runs each September and in September 2022 it is part funded by the European Social Fund through the Welsh Government: in September 2022 it is only open to applicants who work OR live in Wales. From September 2023 it is open to all applicants, regardless of where they live and work, but the fee will be £850.

Learn how technology can improve resource management in livestock production

Precision livestock farming provides continuous automated real-time data to help monitor and manage livestock production at an individual level. This module introduces the latest precision technologies and looks at how these can be used to improve monitoring and benchmarking within intensive and extensive livestock systems. We will also explore the potential for these technologies to improve biosecurity, traceability and reduce losses from the wider supply system.

Want a sneak preview of Unit 1 of this module right now? Join our free open access trial here

List of Units

Introduction: A brief overview of precision technologies past and present

The challenges that precision livestock technologies can solve: Strengths and limitations of precision technologies for producers

Research on current technologies: Novel uses for current technologies, a look at current research into the benefits of certain technologies

Future technologies: Concepts and ideas

Identifying relevant technologies: Look at the research, validation, design and development of new technologies

Transferring technologies between sectors

Utilising outputs: How different actors within a supply system can utilise outputs from precision technologies

Uptake and continuity of new technologies: From early adopters, to jumping the gap, to mainstream

Case Studies: Using case studies to identify how precision technology can be used

137836| Multiple Locations| Precision Livestock|

This module runs each September and in September 2022 it is part funded by the European Social Fund through the Welsh Government: in September 2022 it is only open to applicants who work OR live in Wales. From September 2023 it is open to all applicants, regardless of where they live and work, but the fee will be £850.

Learn how technology can improve resource management in livestock production

Precision livestock farming provides continuous automated real-time data to help monitor and manage livestock production at an individual level. This module introduces the latest precision technologies and looks at how these can be used to improve monitoring and benchmarking within intensive and extensive livestock systems. We will also explore the potential for these technologies to improve biosecurity, traceability and reduce losses from the wider supply system.

Want a sneak preview of Unit 1 of this module right now? Join our free open access trial here

List of Units

Introduction: A brief overview of precision technologies past and present

The challenges that precision livestock technologies can solve: Strengths and limitations of precision technologies for producers

Research on current technologies: Novel uses for current technologies, a look at current research into the benefits of certain technologies

Future technologies: Concepts and ideas

Identifying relevant technologies: Look at the research, validation, design and development of new technologies

Transferring technologies between sectors

Utilising outputs: How different actors within a supply system can utilise outputs from precision technologies

Uptake and continuity of new technologies: From early adopters, to jumping the gap, to mainstream

Case Studies: Using case studies to identify how precision technology can be used

137832| Multiple Locations| Precision Livestock|

This module runs each September and in September 2022 it is part funded by the European Social Fund through the Welsh Government: in September 2022 it is only open to applicants who work OR live in Wales. From September 2023 it is open to all applicants, regardless of where they live and work, but the fee will be £850.

Learn how technology can improve resource management in livestock production

Precision livestock farming provides continuous automated real-time data to help monitor and manage livestock production at an individual level. This module introduces the latest precision technologies and looks at how these can be used to improve monitoring and benchmarking within intensive and extensive livestock systems. We will also explore the potential for these technologies to improve biosecurity, traceability and reduce losses from the wider supply system.

Want a sneak preview of Unit 1 of this module right now? Join our free open access trial here

List of Units

Introduction: A brief overview of precision technologies past and present

The challenges that precision livestock technologies can solve: Strengths and limitations of precision technologies for producers

Research on current technologies: Novel uses for current technologies, a look at current research into the benefits of certain technologies

Future technologies: Concepts and ideas

Identifying relevant technologies: Look at the research, validation, design and development of new technologies

Transferring technologies between sectors

Utilising outputs: How different actors within a supply system can utilise outputs from precision technologies

Uptake and continuity of new technologies: From early adopters, to jumping the gap, to mainstream

Case Studies: Using case studies to identify how precision technology can be used

137822| Multiple Locations| Sustainable Supply Systems|

This module runs each September and in September 2022 it is part funded by the European Social Fund through the Welsh Government: in September 2022 it is only open to applicants who work OR live in Wales. From September 2023 it is open to all applicants, regardless of where they live and work, but the fee will be £850.

A look at innovative approaches to economic and environmentally sustainable supply systems

Food and other bio-based producers, processors and retailers need to work together to maintain product supply for a sustainable future. This module will draw on the latest research to explore the concept of sustainability and the challenges to achieving it. It will consider how economic, environmental and social sustainability can be improved and governed, and examine innovative approaches and technologies available to support this process while maintaining supply of safe, high quality products. This module will be of interest to anyone seeking to understand more about sustainability and how it can be improved in any bio-based supply system.

This module is core to the MSc BioInnovation.

Content

The course will consist of a series of lectures and guided learning focused on:

List of Units

The Challenges: Why food and bio-based supply is different, Defining sustainability and challenges to sustainable supply

Environmental and Social Sustainability: A critical look at key aspects of sustainability and how they are assessed

Nutritional Sustainability and Health: Meeting nutritional, food safety and One Health requirements in sustainable supply

Economics, Business Goals and Sustainability: Key economic concepts for understanding sustainable supply, The aims of businesses and how they achieve them

Paths to Sustainability: From mass production to lean production, Does lean = sustainable? Alternative approaches to the sustainable supply

The Power of Information: Information and sustainability in modern food and bio-based supply, Case study – the red meat supply chain

Added Value from Sustainable Practice: Marketing of sustainability -- Protected Designation of Origin and labelling

Governing Sustainability: Achieving effective governance of food and bio-based supply

Case Studies of Sustainable Supply: Examples of food and bio-based supply in Wales – meeting challenges and improving sustainability

Improving Sustainability in Practice – Innovation in Supply Systems

Exploring innovative options for improved sustainability in specific supply systems

137824| Multiple Locations| Sustainable Supply Systems|

This module runs each September and in September 2022 it is part funded by the European Social Fund through the Welsh Government: in September 2022 it is only open to applicants who work OR live in Wales. From September 2023 it is open to all applicants, regardless of where they live and work, but the fee will be £850.

A look at innovative approaches to economic and environmentally sustainable supply systems

Food and other bio-based producers, processors and retailers need to work together to maintain product supply for a sustainable future. This module will draw on the latest research to explore the concept of sustainability and the challenges to achieving it. It will consider how economic, environmental and social sustainability can be improved and governed, and examine innovative approaches and technologies available to support this process while maintaining supply of safe, high quality products. This module will be of interest to anyone seeking to understand more about sustainability and how it can be improved in any bio-based supply system.

This module is core to the MSc BioInnovation.

Content

The course will consist of a series of lectures and guided learning focused on:

List of Units

The Challenges: Why food and bio-based supply is different, Defining sustainability and challenges to sustainable supply

Environmental and Social Sustainability: A critical look at key aspects of sustainability and how they are assessed

Nutritional Sustainability and Health: Meeting nutritional, food safety and One Health requirements in sustainable supply

Economics, Business Goals and Sustainability: Key economic concepts for understanding sustainable supply, The aims of businesses and how they achieve them

Paths to Sustainability: From mass production to lean production, Does lean = sustainable? Alternative approaches to the sustainable supply

The Power of Information: Information and sustainability in modern food and bio-based supply, Case study – the red meat supply chain

Added Value from Sustainable Practice: Marketing of sustainability -- Protected Designation of Origin and labelling

Governing Sustainability: Achieving effective governance of food and bio-based supply

Case Studies of Sustainable Supply: Examples of food and bio-based supply in Wales – meeting challenges and improving sustainability

Improving Sustainability in Practice – Innovation in Supply Systems

Exploring innovative options for improved sustainability in specific supply systems

137828| Multiple Locations| Sustainable Supply Systems|

This module runs each September and in September 2022 it is part funded by the European Social Fund through the Welsh Government: in September 2022 it is only open to applicants who work OR live in Wales. From September 2023 it is open to all applicants, regardless of where they live and work, but the fee will be £850.

A look at innovative approaches to economic and environmentally sustainable supply systems

Food and other bio-based producers, processors and retailers need to work together to maintain product supply for a sustainable future. This module will draw on the latest research to explore the concept of sustainability and the challenges to achieving it. It will consider how economic, environmental and social sustainability can be improved and governed, and examine innovative approaches and technologies available to support this process while maintaining supply of safe, high quality products. This module will be of interest to anyone seeking to understand more about sustainability and how it can be improved in any bio-based supply system.

This module is core to the MSc BioInnovation.

Content

The course will consist of a series of lectures and guided learning focused on:

List of Units

The Challenges: Why food and bio-based supply is different, Defining sustainability and challenges to sustainable supply

Environmental and Social Sustainability: A critical look at key aspects of sustainability and how they are assessed

Nutritional Sustainability and Health: Meeting nutritional, food safety and One Health requirements in sustainable supply

Economics, Business Goals and Sustainability: Key economic concepts for understanding sustainable supply, The aims of businesses and how they achieve them

Paths to Sustainability: From mass production to lean production, Does lean = sustainable? Alternative approaches to the sustainable supply

The Power of Information: Information and sustainability in modern food and bio-based supply, Case study – the red meat supply chain

Added Value from Sustainable Practice: Marketing of sustainability -- Protected Designation of Origin and labelling

Governing Sustainability: Achieving effective governance of food and bio-based supply

Case Studies of Sustainable Supply: Examples of food and bio-based supply in Wales – meeting challenges and improving sustainability

Improving Sustainability in Practice – Innovation in Supply Systems

Exploring innovative options for improved sustainability in specific supply systems

137826| Multiple Locations| Sustainable Supply Systems|

This module runs each September and in September 2022 it is part funded by the European Social Fund through the Welsh Government: in September 2022 it is only open to applicants who work OR live in Wales. From September 2023 it is open to all applicants, regardless of where they live and work, but the fee will be £850.

A look at innovative approaches to economic and environmentally sustainable supply systems

Food and other bio-based producers, processors and retailers need to work together to maintain product supply for a sustainable future. This module will draw on the latest research to explore the concept of sustainability and the challenges to achieving it. It will consider how economic, environmental and social sustainability can be improved and governed, and examine innovative approaches and technologies available to support this process while maintaining supply of safe, high quality products. This module will be of interest to anyone seeking to understand more about sustainability and how it can be improved in any bio-based supply system.

This module is core to the MSc BioInnovation.

Content

The course will consist of a series of lectures and guided learning focused on:

List of Units

The Challenges: Why food and bio-based supply is different, Defining sustainability and challenges to sustainable supply

Environmental and Social Sustainability: A critical look at key aspects of sustainability and how they are assessed

Nutritional Sustainability and Health: Meeting nutritional, food safety and One Health requirements in sustainable supply

Economics, Business Goals and Sustainability: Key economic concepts for understanding sustainable supply, The aims of businesses and how they achieve them

Paths to Sustainability: From mass production to lean production, Does lean = sustainable? Alternative approaches to the sustainable supply

The Power of Information: Information and sustainability in modern food and bio-based supply, Case study – the red meat supply chain

Added Value from Sustainable Practice: Marketing of sustainability -- Protected Designation of Origin and labelling

Governing Sustainability: Achieving effective governance of food and bio-based supply

Case Studies of Sustainable Supply: Examples of food and bio-based supply in Wales – meeting challenges and improving sustainability

Improving Sustainability in Practice – Innovation in Supply Systems

Exploring innovative options for improved sustainability in specific supply systems

137814| Multiple Locations| Public Goods|

This module runs each September and in September 2022 it is part funded by the European Social Fund through the Welsh Government: in September 2022 it is only open to applicants who work OR live in Wales. From September 2023 it is open to all applicants, regardless of where they live and work, but the fee will be £850.

  • What are public goods? How might they affect your business?

    The concept of public goods is becoming increasingly important in national and international legislation and could affect any business that may have an impact on the environment. So what are public goods and why do you need to know about them? The UK National Ecosystem Assessment (2011) describes a public good as “a good or service in which the benefit received by any one party does not diminish the availability of the benefits to others, and where access to the good cannot be restricted”. Public goods encompass other terms you may have encountered such as biodiversity, ecosystem services and natural capital and could include a whole host of benefits such as clean air, a good view or healthy soils.

    This module is aimed at:
    • policy makers,
    • knowledge exchange professionals,
    • any business that has an impact on the environment

    WANT A SNEAK PREVIEW OF THIS MODULE RIGHT NOW? CLICK HERE

    List of Units

    What are public goods?
    • Describe and compare the different uses of the term ‘public goods’ and related concepts
    • Identify key public goods relating to agricultural production
    Soil and Water
    • Assess the public goods roles of soil and water and how they interact
    • Describe the challenges to maintaining the public goods roles of soil and water
    • Summarize the key requirements for maintaining the public goods roles of soil and water
    • Evaluate the role of farming in soil and water management
    Air
    • Assess the public goods roles of air
    • Describe the challenges to maintaining the public goods roles of air
    • Summarize the key requirements for maintaining the public goods roles of the air
    • Evaluate the role of farming in relation to greenhouse gas emissions and clean air
    Biodiversity
    • Assess the public goods roles of biodiversity
    • Describe the challenges to maintaining the public goods roles of biodiversity
    • Summarize the key requirements for maintaining the public goods roles of biodiversity
    • Evaluate the role of farming in relation to biodiversity
    Culture
    • Assess the public goods roles of culture
    • Describe the challenges to maintaining the public goods roles of culture
    • Summarize the key requirements for maintaining the public goods roles of culture
    • Evaluate the role of farming in relation to culture
    Health
    • Assess the public goods roles of health
    • Describe the challenges to maintaining the public goods roles of health
    • Summarize the key requirements for maintaining the public goods roles of health
    • Evaluate the role of farming in relation to health
    Systems perspective on public goods
    • Examine how key public goods interact
    • Critique current practical measures to protect and enhance public goods
    Valuing public goods
    • Describe different types of value and their relevance to key public goods
    • Appraise the values behind key public goods initiatives in the UK
    Governing public goods provision
    • Describe and compare different theories of governance for public goods
    • Investigate the motivations of institutions and individuals to enhance the provision of public goods
    • Critique the main approaches to governing key public goods in the UK
    The future of public goods
    • Assess the outlook for the provision of key public goods
    • Apply your knowledge of public goods to evaluate new approaches to their management
137818| Multiple Locations| Public Goods|

This module runs each September and in September 2022 it is part funded by the European Social Fund through the Welsh Government: in September 2022 it is only open to applicants who work OR live in Wales. From September 2023 it is open to all applicants, regardless of where they live and work, but the fee will be £850.

  • What are public goods? How might they affect your business?

    The concept of public goods is becoming increasingly important in national and international legislation and could affect any business that may have an impact on the environment. So what are public goods and why do you need to know about them? The UK National Ecosystem Assessment (2011) describes a public good as “a good or service in which the benefit received by any one party does not diminish the availability of the benefits to others, and where access to the good cannot be restricted”. Public goods encompass other terms you may have encountered such as biodiversity, ecosystem services and natural capital and could include a whole host of benefits such as clean air, a good view or healthy soils.

    This module is aimed at:
    • policy makers,
    • knowledge exchange professionals,
    • any business that has an impact on the environment

    WANT A SNEAK PREVIEW OF THIS MODULE RIGHT NOW? CLICK HERE

    List of Units

    What are public goods?
    • Describe and compare the different uses of the term ‘public goods’ and related concepts
    • Identify key public goods relating to agricultural production
    Soil and Water
    • Assess the public goods roles of soil and water and how they interact
    • Describe the challenges to maintaining the public goods roles of soil and water
    • Summarize the key requirements for maintaining the public goods roles of soil and water
    • Evaluate the role of farming in soil and water management
    Air
    • Assess the public goods roles of air
    • Describe the challenges to maintaining the public goods roles of air
    • Summarize the key requirements for maintaining the public goods roles of the air
    • Evaluate the role of farming in relation to greenhouse gas emissions and clean air
    Biodiversity
    • Assess the public goods roles of biodiversity
    • Describe the challenges to maintaining the public goods roles of biodiversity
    • Summarize the key requirements for maintaining the public goods roles of biodiversity
    • Evaluate the role of farming in relation to biodiversity
    Culture
    • Assess the public goods roles of culture
    • Describe the challenges to maintaining the public goods roles of culture
    • Summarize the key requirements for maintaining the public goods roles of culture
    • Evaluate the role of farming in relation to culture
    Health
    • Assess the public goods roles of health
    • Describe the challenges to maintaining the public goods roles of health
    • Summarize the key requirements for maintaining the public goods roles of health
    • Evaluate the role of farming in relation to health
    Systems perspective on public goods
    • Examine how key public goods interact
    • Critique current practical measures to protect and enhance public goods
    Valuing public goods
    • Describe different types of value and their relevance to key public goods
    • Appraise the values behind key public goods initiatives in the UK
    Governing public goods provision
    • Describe and compare different theories of governance for public goods
    • Investigate the motivations of institutions and individuals to enhance the provision of public goods
    • Critique the main approaches to governing key public goods in the UK
    The future of public goods
    • Assess the outlook for the provision of key public goods
    • Apply your knowledge of public goods to evaluate new approaches to their management
137820| Multiple Locations| Public Goods|

This module runs each September and in September 2022 it is part funded by the European Social Fund through the Welsh Government: in September 2022 it is only open to applicants who work OR live in Wales. From September 2023 it is open to all applicants, regardless of where they live and work, but the fee will be £850.

  • What are public goods? How might they affect your business?

    The concept of public goods is becoming increasingly important in national and international legislation and could affect any business that may have an impact on the environment. So what are public goods and why do you need to know about them? The UK National Ecosystem Assessment (2011) describes a public good as “a good or service in which the benefit received by any one party does not diminish the availability of the benefits to others, and where access to the good cannot be restricted”. Public goods encompass other terms you may have encountered such as biodiversity, ecosystem services and natural capital and could include a whole host of benefits such as clean air, a good view or healthy soils.

    This module is aimed at:
    • policy makers,
    • knowledge exchange professionals,
    • any business that has an impact on the environment

    WANT A SNEAK PREVIEW OF THIS MODULE RIGHT NOW? CLICK HERE

    List of Units

    What are public goods?
    • Describe and compare the different uses of the term ‘public goods’ and related concepts
    • Identify key public goods relating to agricultural production
    Soil and Water
    • Assess the public goods roles of soil and water and how they interact
    • Describe the challenges to maintaining the public goods roles of soil and water
    • Summarize the key requirements for maintaining the public goods roles of soil and water
    • Evaluate the role of farming in soil and water management
    Air
    • Assess the public goods roles of air
    • Describe the challenges to maintaining the public goods roles of air
    • Summarize the key requirements for maintaining the public goods roles of the air
    • Evaluate the role of farming in relation to greenhouse gas emissions and clean air
    Biodiversity
    • Assess the public goods roles of biodiversity
    • Describe the challenges to maintaining the public goods roles of biodiversity
    • Summarize the key requirements for maintaining the public goods roles of biodiversity
    • Evaluate the role of farming in relation to biodiversity
    Culture
    • Assess the public goods roles of culture
    • Describe the challenges to maintaining the public goods roles of culture
    • Summarize the key requirements for maintaining the public goods roles of culture
    • Evaluate the role of farming in relation to culture
    Health
    • Assess the public goods roles of health
    • Describe the challenges to maintaining the public goods roles of health
    • Summarize the key requirements for maintaining the public goods roles of health
    • Evaluate the role of farming in relation to health
    Systems perspective on public goods
    • Examine how key public goods interact
    • Critique current practical measures to protect and enhance public goods
    Valuing public goods
    • Describe different types of value and their relevance to key public goods
    • Appraise the values behind key public goods initiatives in the UK
    Governing public goods provision
    • Describe and compare different theories of governance for public goods
    • Investigate the motivations of institutions and individuals to enhance the provision of public goods
    • Critique the main approaches to governing key public goods in the UK
    The future of public goods
    • Assess the outlook for the provision of key public goods
    • Apply your knowledge of public goods to evaluate new approaches to their management
137816| Multiple Locations| Public Goods|

This module runs each September and in September 2022 it is part funded by the European Social Fund through the Welsh Government: in September 2022 it is only open to applicants who work OR live in Wales. From September 2023 it is open to all applicants, regardless of where they live and work, but the fee will be £850.

  • What are public goods? How might they affect your business?

    The concept of public goods is becoming increasingly important in national and international legislation and could affect any business that may have an impact on the environment. So what are public goods and why do you need to know about them? The UK National Ecosystem Assessment (2011) describes a public good as “a good or service in which the benefit received by any one party does not diminish the availability of the benefits to others, and where access to the good cannot be restricted”. Public goods encompass other terms you may have encountered such as biodiversity, ecosystem services and natural capital and could include a whole host of benefits such as clean air, a good view or healthy soils.

    This module is aimed at:
    • policy makers,
    • knowledge exchange professionals,
    • any business that has an impact on the environment

    WANT A SNEAK PREVIEW OF THIS MODULE RIGHT NOW? CLICK HERE

    List of Units

    What are public goods?
    • Describe and compare the different uses of the term ‘public goods’ and related concepts
    • Identify key public goods relating to agricultural production
    Soil and Water
    • Assess the public goods roles of soil and water and how they interact
    • Describe the challenges to maintaining the public goods roles of soil and water
    • Summarize the key requirements for maintaining the public goods roles of soil and water
    • Evaluate the role of farming in soil and water management
    Air
    • Assess the public goods roles of air
    • Describe the challenges to maintaining the public goods roles of air
    • Summarize the key requirements for maintaining the public goods roles of the air
    • Evaluate the role of farming in relation to greenhouse gas emissions and clean air
    Biodiversity
    • Assess the public goods roles of biodiversity
    • Describe the challenges to maintaining the public goods roles of biodiversity
    • Summarize the key requirements for maintaining the public goods roles of biodiversity
    • Evaluate the role of farming in relation to biodiversity
    Culture
    • Assess the public goods roles of culture
    • Describe the challenges to maintaining the public goods roles of culture
    • Summarize the key requirements for maintaining the public goods roles of culture
    • Evaluate the role of farming in relation to culture
    Health
    • Assess the public goods roles of health
    • Describe the challenges to maintaining the public goods roles of health
    • Summarize the key requirements for maintaining the public goods roles of health
    • Evaluate the role of farming in relation to health
    Systems perspective on public goods
    • Examine how key public goods interact
    • Critique current practical measures to protect and enhance public goods
    Valuing public goods
    • Describe different types of value and their relevance to key public goods
    • Appraise the values behind key public goods initiatives in the UK
    Governing public goods provision
    • Describe and compare different theories of governance for public goods
    • Investigate the motivations of institutions and individuals to enhance the provision of public goods
    • Critique the main approaches to governing key public goods in the UK
    The future of public goods
    • Assess the outlook for the provision of key public goods
    • Apply your knowledge of public goods to evaluate new approaches to their management
137808| Multiple Locations| Meat Processing|

This module runs each September and in September 2022 it is part funded by the European Social Fund through the Welsh Government: in September 2022 it is only open to applicants who work OR live in Wales. From September 2023 it is open to all applicants, regardless of where they live and work, but the fee will be £850.

Learn about the latest advances in the field of controlled environment agriculture (CEA) and how to develop controlled growing systems

Controlled Environment Agriculture (CEA) is a technology-based approach to food production, allowing growers/food producers and agri-tech businesses to optimise growing conditions and resource usage. CEA has the potential to increase business resilience and food security in the face of factors such as climate change and land availability. This module introduces students to the latest advances in this rapidly developing area of agriculture, highlighting the benefits of a range of controlled environments and their potential for improved products and food security.

Many thanks to our contributors -

The course will consist of a series of lectures and guided learning focused on:

List of Units

Why Controlled Environment Agriculture (CEA)?

  • The challenges we face regarding agriculture and food production.
  • The potential of CEA to meet some of the future food challenges
  • Overview of CEA technologies.

Challenges of CEA

  • Challenges and opportunities surrounding the policy landscape/net zero carbon regarding the implementation of CEA technology.
  • Economic challenges to the application of CEA technology.
  • Potential limitations of CEA technology implementation, resulting from economic constraints.

Overview of existing CEA systems: virtual field trip

  • Technological elements of a CEA production system.
  • Identifying key technologies to maintain appropriate environmental conditions for plant growth.
  • Opportunities and challenges for the use of advanced technologies, including automation, in CEA.

Plant Biology and CEA

  • Key principles of plant biology
  • Identify characteristics of plant physiology
  • Applying general plant biology principles to controlled environments
  • Applying an understanding of the nature of plants to the specific constraints of CEA systems

Agronomy: growing plants in CEA systems

  • Key agronomic factors affecting plant cultivation in CEA systems
  • Impacts of technological choices on plant growth, and interpretation of selections made by CEA enterprises
  • Viable solutions to plant production challenges using CEA systems.

Plant Stress

  • Key drivers of plant stress
  • Mechanisms that plants have evolved to counter stress
  • Ways in which a controlled environment can be modified to promote certain stress responses

Design considerations for CEA infrastructure

  • CEA system design challenges
  • Key components of CEA system technology, recognising the interconnected role of each component
  • Approaches to achieving system integration
  • Functional CEA system design.

CEA system control

  • Monitoring and control in an automated CEA system
  • Application of data capture, machine learning and web-based systems for improved efficiency
  • The use of imaging techniques to monitor plants in CEA systems

The potential for co-location and circular economy solutions

  • The importance of circular economy principles to the agri-food supply chain
  • Key components of a CEA enterprise which enable the application of circular economy principles
  • Business models and/or synergistic relationships which could improve the circularity of resources in a CEA enterprise.
137812| Multiple Locations| Meat Processing|

This module runs each September and in September 2022 it is part funded by the European Social Fund through the Welsh Government: in September 2022 it is only open to applicants who work OR live in Wales. From September 2023 it is open to all applicants, regardless of where they live and work, but the fee will be £850.

Learn about the latest advances in the field of controlled environment agriculture (CEA) and how to develop controlled growing systems

Controlled Environment Agriculture (CEA) is a technology-based approach to food production, allowing growers/food producers and agri-tech businesses to optimise growing conditions and resource usage. CEA has the potential to increase business resilience and food security in the face of factors such as climate change and land availability. This module introduces students to the latest advances in this rapidly developing area of agriculture, highlighting the benefits of a range of controlled environments and their potential for improved products and food security.

Many thanks to our contributors -

The course will consist of a series of lectures and guided learning focused on:

List of Units

Why Controlled Environment Agriculture (CEA)?

  • The challenges we face regarding agriculture and food production.
  • The potential of CEA to meet some of the future food challenges
  • Overview of CEA technologies.

Challenges of CEA

  • Challenges and opportunities surrounding the policy landscape/net zero carbon regarding the implementation of CEA technology.
  • Economic challenges to the application of CEA technology.
  • Potential limitations of CEA technology implementation, resulting from economic constraints.

Overview of existing CEA systems: virtual field trip

  • Technological elements of a CEA production system.
  • Identifying key technologies to maintain appropriate environmental conditions for plant growth.
  • Opportunities and challenges for the use of advanced technologies, including automation, in CEA.

Plant Biology and CEA

  • Key principles of plant biology
  • Identify characteristics of plant physiology
  • Applying general plant biology principles to controlled environments
  • Applying an understanding of the nature of plants to the specific constraints of CEA systems

Agronomy: growing plants in CEA systems

  • Key agronomic factors affecting plant cultivation in CEA systems
  • Impacts of technological choices on plant growth, and interpretation of selections made by CEA enterprises
  • Viable solutions to plant production challenges using CEA systems.

Plant Stress

  • Key drivers of plant stress
  • Mechanisms that plants have evolved to counter stress
  • Ways in which a controlled environment can be modified to promote certain stress responses

Design considerations for CEA infrastructure

  • CEA system design challenges
  • Key components of CEA system technology, recognising the interconnected role of each component
  • Approaches to achieving system integration
  • Functional CEA system design.

CEA system control

  • Monitoring and control in an automated CEA system
  • Application of data capture, machine learning and web-based systems for improved efficiency
  • The use of imaging techniques to monitor plants in CEA systems

The potential for co-location and circular economy solutions

  • The importance of circular economy principles to the agri-food supply chain
  • Key components of a CEA enterprise which enable the application of circular economy principles
  • Business models and/or synergistic relationships which could improve the circularity of resources in a CEA enterprise.
137810| Multiple Locations| Meat Processing|

This module runs each September and in September 2022 it is part funded by the European Social Fund through the Welsh Government: in September 2022 it is only open to applicants who work OR live in Wales. From September 2023 it is open to all applicants, regardless of where they live and work, but the fee will be £850.

Learn about the latest advances in the field of controlled environment agriculture (CEA) and how to develop controlled growing systems

Controlled Environment Agriculture (CEA) is a technology-based approach to food production, allowing growers/food producers and agri-tech businesses to optimise growing conditions and resource usage. CEA has the potential to increase business resilience and food security in the face of factors such as climate change and land availability. This module introduces students to the latest advances in this rapidly developing area of agriculture, highlighting the benefits of a range of controlled environments and their potential for improved products and food security.

Many thanks to our contributors -

The course will consist of a series of lectures and guided learning focused on:

List of Units

Why Controlled Environment Agriculture (CEA)?

  • The challenges we face regarding agriculture and food production.
  • The potential of CEA to meet some of the future food challenges
  • Overview of CEA technologies.

Challenges of CEA

  • Challenges and opportunities surrounding the policy landscape/net zero carbon regarding the implementation of CEA technology.
  • Economic challenges to the application of CEA technology.
  • Potential limitations of CEA technology implementation, resulting from economic constraints.

Overview of existing CEA systems: virtual field trip

  • Technological elements of a CEA production system.
  • Identifying key technologies to maintain appropriate environmental conditions for plant growth.
  • Opportunities and challenges for the use of advanced technologies, including automation, in CEA.

Plant Biology and CEA

  • Key principles of plant biology
  • Identify characteristics of plant physiology
  • Applying general plant biology principles to controlled environments
  • Applying an understanding of the nature of plants to the specific constraints of CEA systems

Agronomy: growing plants in CEA systems

  • Key agronomic factors affecting plant cultivation in CEA systems
  • Impacts of technological choices on plant growth, and interpretation of selections made by CEA enterprises
  • Viable solutions to plant production challenges using CEA systems.

Plant Stress

  • Key drivers of plant stress
  • Mechanisms that plants have evolved to counter stress
  • Ways in which a controlled environment can be modified to promote certain stress responses

Design considerations for CEA infrastructure

  • CEA system design challenges
  • Key components of CEA system technology, recognising the interconnected role of each component
  • Approaches to achieving system integration
  • Functional CEA system design.

CEA system control

  • Monitoring and control in an automated CEA system
  • Application of data capture, machine learning and web-based systems for improved efficiency
  • The use of imaging techniques to monitor plants in CEA systems

The potential for co-location and circular economy solutions

  • The importance of circular economy principles to the agri-food supply chain
  • Key components of a CEA enterprise which enable the application of circular economy principles
  • Business models and/or synergistic relationships which could improve the circularity of resources in a CEA enterprise.
137807| West Dean College| Writing and using a preservation policy|

This one-day course is part of a new series of continued professional development courses in libraries preservation and collections care in collaboration with the British Library.

A preservation policy is a framework that enables an organisation to embed collections care and collections management within its structures and activities, and to understand the resources necessary to implement these key responsibilities. This training day explains the purpose and benefits of a preservation policy and provides guidance on writing a policy for your organisation. We will review examples of policies from a range of organisations and you will have experience of drafting a policy.

By the end of the day, participants will be able to:
Analyse how best to establish preservation as a key objective of the organisation.
Explain what a preservation policy is and how it links to other strategic and business planning documents.
Identify what needs to be included in a preservation policy and why.
Describe issues that need to be considered when implementing a preservation policy.
Create an action plan for writing or reviewing their own organisation's preservation policy.

The training is appropriate for librarians, archivists, collection managers, conservators and others working in libraries, archive, museums as well as in companies and other collecting organisations. 

This course takes place at the British Library in London. A working lunch in the Foyle Room is included.

137806| West Dean College| Dust and dirt: Strategies for prevention and management|

This one-day course is part of a new series of continued professional development courses in libraries preservation and collections care in collaboration with the British Library.

This training day builds an understanding of what dust is and why its management is important. It explores low-cost methods of monitoring dust and dirt and discusses methods of preventing its build-up. The day includes practical sessions on how to clean books and stack areas. It provides steps to follow when setting up a housekeeping programme and highlights what to think about if you are considering involving volunteers. The training day is led by Caroline Bendix ACR (Independent Conservator) and Karen Bradford (British Library).

During the course you will learn:
What is dust and why does it matter? 
Monitoring and measuring dust - A case study in progress at the British Library. 
Practical measures to prevent dust and dirt. 
Cleaning books and documents, shelves and stacks. 
Setting up a housekeeping programme and working with volunteers 

The course will take place at the British Library in London. A working lunch in the Foyle Room is included.

137805| West Dean College| Damaged books and bound archives: practical first steps|

This one-day course is part of a new series of continued professional development courses in libraries preservation and collections care in collaboration with the British Library.

This training day is aimed at librarians and archivists. It provides an overview of how books and bound archives become damaged, considers actions to minimise damage, and describes first steps to address common forms of damage. The training day is led by Caroline Bendix ACR (Independent Conservator).

During the course you will learn:

  • Identification of different types of damage and recognition of the causes. 
  • Simple steps for minimising damage. 
  • Understanding appropriate treatment options and decision-making for remedial treatment. 
  • Understanding use of protective enclosures. 
  • Protective exercise in tying tape and making melinex™ wrapper. 
  • Working with conservation volunteers

This course takes place at the British Library in London. A working lunch in the Foyle Room is included.

137804| West Dean College| Disaster response and salvage training|

This one-day course is part of a new series of continued professional development courses in libraries preservation and collections care in collaboration with the British Library.

This intensive course focuses on preparing for disaster response and salvage. The course uses experience of responding to real incidents to demonstrate how planning can minimise the impact of emergencies in libraries and archives as well as outlining the practical steps to take when responding to situations. With reference to case studies, the course includes strategies for dealing with damage, an emergency decision-making exercise and a major incident desktop scenario. By the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the key issues that a disaster plan needs to address
  • Give examples of the decisions to be made when responding to an incident
  • Source salvage equipment to build a disaster kit

The course takes place at the British Library in London. A working lunch in the Foyle Room is included.

137802| West Dean College| Digitisation: planning & processes pt 2|

This one-day course is part of a new series of continued professional development courses in libraries preservation and collections care in collaboration with the British Library.

Digitisation can increase access to collections, provide surrogates for vulnerable originals and enable virtual reunification of collections. But how do you know where to start? What equipment do you need, what type of image should you create, how do you prepare items for digitisation and make plans for their digital access?

This training day is a practical follow-up to Day 1. It is focused on pre-digitisation assessments, imaging standards and equipment. Training opportunities will be facilitated through practical demonstrations and tours of digitisation areas.

This course takes place at the British Library in London. A working lunch in the Foyle Room is included.

137801| West Dean College| Digitisation: planning & processes pt 1|

This one-day short course is part of a new series of continued professional development courses in libraries preservation and collections care in collaboration with the British Library.

Digitisation can increase access to collections, provide surrogates for vulnerable originals and enable virtual reunification of collections. But how do you know where to start? What equipment do you need, what type of image should you create, how do you prepare items for digitisation and make plans for their digital access?

This training day will answer those questions to enable you to start a digitisation project. It concentrates on ‘still image’ capture and outlines the processes involved in planning digitisation projects. It is focused on the digitisation of library and archive materials mainly from the British Library collections and other related projects. The day includes guidance on copyright licensing, metadata and workflow management.

Part 2 of this course takes place on 1st July 2022. More info can be found here.


This course takes place at the British Library in London. A working lunch in the Foyle Room is included in your booking.

137800| West Dean College| Environment: Effective monitoring and management|

This one day short course is part of the new series of continued professional development courses in libraries preservation and collections care in collaboration with the British Library. 

This training day is aimed at people with responsibility for the care of library and archive collections. It is led by Jane Henderson, Professor of Conservation at Cardiff University.

Avoiding a 'one size fits all' approach to environmental parameters, the day helps you to understand the vulnerabilities and tolerances of your collections with a focus on humidity and temperature. It then shows how to set realistic and achievable targets that are appropriate to the materials in your care and the resources available to you. At the end of the day you will be in a strong position to take cost-effective decisions and prioritise actions for maintaining a sustainable environment. 

The short course will take place at the British Library in London. A working lunch in the Foyle Room is included.

137799| West Dean College| Managing Wildlife in the Historic Environment|

Gain an understanding of the range of protected plant and animal species found on and in historic buildings and their sites. Obtain guidance on current wildlife protection legislation, the importance of biodiversity, and implications for the management of historic sites including survey and work windows and potential funding streams.

Flora and fauna contribute to the aesthetic appeal of sites and are valuable educational resources. The course looks at flora and fauna of historic structures and their settings, how to use vegetation to protect exposed, ruined wall tops ("soft capping"), and how to cope with "problem" and invasive species. The course includes illustrated lectures and local site visits within the West Dean estate including the Devil's Jumps Scheduled Monument and Local Nature Reserve, the environs of the private Victorian railway station and West Dean Gardens.

The course will provide key knowledge and tools for the practical and appropriate management of historic buildings and sites.  Subjects will include: 
•    protected species
•    types of survey and their timeframes
•    priority habitats, including trees, and how these interact with monuments and structures
•    the control of “problem” and invasive plant and animal species
The implications of legislation for the management of historic buildings and sites and the broader contextual issues of climate change and adaptation will be core to the teaching with speakers sharing their own specific professional experience.  This will include access to a bat hibernation site at West Dean in the company of a licensed handler.  In addition, the course will offer an introduction to current and future agri- environmental grant schemes with capacity to benefit the historic environment and a presentation on historic designed landscapes and how they can help glue built and natural environment considerations together.


This course is intended for anyone engaged in the conservation and management of historic buildings and sites, from building professionals, architects, surveyors, engineers, to contractors and site managers.

 

Free parking is available on-site.

137798| West Dean College| Conservation and Repair of Tile Roofing|

This course covers the history of traditional hand and machine-made plain tiles, pantiles and other forms of fired material used for roofing, but mainly concentrates on their conservation and repair.

You will start by gaining an understanding of how roofs work and the various different materials used, including regional variations and methods of construction. Modern codes of practice and standards are covered. Practical demonstrations and hands-on work in preparing tiles, pantiles and mortar and their application to roofs, including setting out and recording and dealing with ridges, valleys, eaves etc. The course will be supplemented by practical sessions on surveying old roofs, traditional detailing, writing specifications and finding sources of information.

The course timetable is as follows:

Monday 23rd May
16.00- 18.00- Register at Reception Desk
18.45- Welcome Talk
19.00- Dinner
20.00- Introduction Lecture

Tuesday 24th May
09.00- Conservation and understanding tiling: How tiled roofs work; single lap fixed gauge and variable gauge; overs and unders; tegula and imbrex; double lap plain tiles; evolution from vernacular to modern.
Sorting tiles to understand the difference between hand-made and machine-made tiles.
Lecture- Regional roof types; materials - types of clays and different styles of clay tiles and formats. Guides and codes of practice etc; British/European standards.
Clay tile production. Big production machine-made v hand-made manufacturing.
16.30- Recording a vernacular tiled roof.
19.00- 19.45- Dinner

Wednesday 25th May
09.00- Setting out for fixed gauge and variable gauge large format clay tiles. Overs and unders, tegulas and imbrex. Hand-made plain tiles v modern machine-made.
Practical- Mortars
16.00- 17.30- Gauging tiled roofs; battening, setting out a roof for swept laced PMV and lead valleys. Start to tile the rigs using machine-made tiles and/or hand-made tiles.
19.00- 19.45- Dinner

Thursday 26th May
09.00- Tiling the roof using modern and hand-made plain tiles to the four areas to include valleys. Recording the roofs and presenting the findings of the tiled roof recordings.
15.30- 16.00- Issue of certificates and depart.

Free parking available on-site.

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