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Latest CPD Courses
133223| Oryon Develop| Running and Athletic Injuries: Bone Stress and Exercise Induced Leg Pain|

Oryon Develop are pleased to welcome Dr Rick Seah, Consultant in Sport and Exercise Medicine, for this evening course looking at injuries commonly sustained through athletics.

In the first half of this evening course, Dr Seah will look at bone stress injuries (BSI). These are common overuse injuries associated with repetitive loading of bone by vigorous weight-bearing activity (such as running/ jogging/ marching) and inadequate recovery. We will discuss the risk factors in developing BSI. This will include intrinsic factors such as anatomy (Femoral anteversion, leg length discrepancy, narrow tibia and small calf girth etc).

Dr Seah will also discuss the intrinsic factors that could result in female athletes being more vulnerable to BSI. We will then move on to extrinsic factors that you can help control in order to increase a patient’s resistance to BSI - such as training regimes, footwear and training surface etc.

Exercise induced leg pain is extremely common in runners and has a wide differential diagnosis including stress fractures, medial tibial stress syndrome, chronic exertional compartment and vascular syndromes.  Tendinopathy of the patella and achilles tendons are also prevalent.  Therefore in the second half of the evening Dr Seah will cover the presenting symptoms, clinical examination, investigation, treatment and rehabilitation of these common injuries.

Agenda:

Part One – Bone Stress Injuries

  • Epidemiology
  • Risk factors – extrinsic and intrinsic
  • Are women more at risk?
  • Treatment options

Part Two – Exercise Induced Leg Pain

  • Common presentations of EILP
  • Examination of patients with EILP
  • Investigating EILP
  • Treatment and rehabilitation of EILP

What's Included:

admission to course, 2 hours CPD, speakers' handouts, light refreshments, Certificate of Attendance.

Cost:

£36+VAT

Take advantage of our group booking discount today. Book onto 3 or more courses at once, or book on with some colleagues to qualify for this discount:

3 bookings: 10% discount
4 bookings: 15% discount
5(+) bookings: 20% discount
Offer available by calling 020 7042 1899 only

133221| The Acupuncture Association of Chartered Physiotherapists| AACP Acupuncture Foundation Course - Ascot - September 2019|

This course is divided equally between direct contact time and self-directed learning. It is designed to offer participants a level of knowledge, skill and understanding that will allow them to practice acupuncture in a safe and appropriate manner, in a clinical setting.
The course provides a Western medical approach to acupuncture - grounded in current research evidence rather than in traditional Chinese philosophical thinking. This course does not cover the traditional Chinese medical approach to acupuncture, except where Western scientific theory and evidence can be used to explain concepts of traditional Chinese medicine (e.g. fascial planes and meridians).

 

Participants will be encouraged to critically evaluate their own clinical practice and where appropriate, challenge the current evidence base. This course is designed to provide participants with a rationale for using acupuncture as an adjunctive treatment for the management of common musculoskeletal pain conditions. Topics covered include the laboratory and radiological research which is used to explain the mechanism of acupuncture analgesia; current evidence from acupuncture clinical trials research; and the non-specific "placebo" effects associated with acupuncture analgesia. In addition to needling classical acupuncture points, participants will be introduced to the concept of myofascial trigger points, and the use of acupuncture needling for pain associated with myofascial trigger points.

 

Students must:
- have HCPC physiotherapy registration
- have CSP membership
- be able to practise acupuncture in a clinical setting between the course parts
- give the tutor informed consent to receive repetitive needling (with particular regard to being or trying to become pregnant).
- be able to treat three separate patients in a safe and legal environment for their case studies. Failure to do so may affect your professional HCPC registration. (see AACP website for safety guidelines)
- attend all 6 days of the course

 

Training Hours: 300

Deposit: £150.00 (Remaining balance of £399.00 is due 21 days before the course start date)
Full Course Price: £549.00

 

"Employer Paying" - Important Information
Before registering onto this course, please click on the below “Employer Paying Application" for information on how to register your funding.
No "Employer Paying" bookings will be accepted during the 30 days before the course start date.
All course bookings made within the 30 days must be paid in full at the time of registration.
For full terms and conditions, please click  here.

133217| University of Birmingham| Qualitative Research Methods|

Qualitative Research Methods
Through a series of workshops and practical sessions, you will be introduced to a variety of qualitative research methods and analysis, which have been developed and used within health and medical research. You will be encouraged to learn through experience, through practical sessions, and in research tasks completed in directed study time. You will also be trained in research writing as appropriate for different methodologies and traditions.

Learning outcomes
By the end of the module you should be able to:

  • To gain an understanding of the role, purpose and limitations of qualitative enquiry, its appropriate use, and its relevance to healthcare practice and research.
  • To demonstrate an understanding of a variety of approaches to qualitative analysis and to be able to analyse and interpret qualitative data, the advantages and disadvantages of each, and the role of theory in qualitative research.
  • To develop skills to devise, and design and carry out a qualitative study.

Credits 
20 credits 

Module Attendance Required
1 block week of teaching 

Module Dates 
2018/19
First iteration:
28 January 2019 – 1 February 2019

Second iteration:
17 - 21 June 2019

Assessment
2 assessments (2500 words each): a) critical appraisal of a qualitative paper and b) data interpretation exercise

Module Coordinator
Dr Antje Lindenmeyer

Stand Alone Course 
This module can be taken as a standalone course. The module can be taken as assessed or non assessed. To apply, please contact the Programme Coordinator on 0121 414 7577 or at [email protected]. All applications must be received a minimum of one month before the start date of the module. For further information on fees or entry requirements, please contact the Programme Coordinator.

133216| University of Birmingham| Project Management and Research Governance|

Project management and research governance is a compulsory module in the Clinical Health Research MRes programme and can be taken as a component of other health related courses, or as a stand-alone module.

The module provides an essential overview of the practical aspects involved within project management and research governance. The content of the module reflects five specific themes surrounding research governance:

  1. Introduction to the science and principles of research governance
  2. Ethics in research
  3. Information & documentation
  4. Project management, finance and intellectual property
  5. Health & safety and employment within research

Students will initially consider the development of knowledge in relation to cultural and ethical dimensions of research, and critically consider the theory and practice of Good Clinical Practice (GCP). They will explore the systems involved in securing ethical approval for research and the regulations arising from the Research Governance Framework (DH2005). This module will also critically review the essentials involved in effective project management including pre-project planning, developing realistic time frames and effective time management.

The module is delivered via online sessions and discussion forums. There will be opportunities for students to network face to face and online with other students to support each other learning. There will also be opportunities to interact with experienced researchers in online discussions of the modules themes.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the module you should be able to:

  • Demonstrate evidential understanding of the main aspects of research governance
  • Critically analyse professional, transferable and application skills necessary to carry out research in a patient centred manner attributable to Good Clinical Practice (GCP)
  • Critically evaluate the project management skills required to undertake high quality research
  • Be sensitive to the risk of vulnerabilities of patients and carers who maybe participating in health related research

Credits

20 credits

Module Attendance Required

Distance online learning supplemented with discussion forums and individual tutorials on request.

Module Dates

2018/19 dates

Autumn Term

  • 31 October 2018 - workshop
  • 5 December 2018 - workshop 
  • Essay submission: 11 January 2019
  • Results due - 1 February 2019

Spring Term

  • 13 February 2019 - workshop
  • 12 March 2019 - workshop
  • Essay submission: 29 April 2019
  • Results due - 21 May 2019

Summer Term

  • 22 May 2019 - workshop
  • 19 June 2019  workshop
  • Essay submission: 22 July 2018
  • Results due - 12 August 2019

Academics involved in the delivery of this module

Nikolaos Efstathiou - Programme Lead Health Research (MRes) for nursing and midwifery 
Telephone: +44 (0)121 415 8587 
Email: [email protected]

Stand Alone Course

This module can be taken as a stand alone course if required. To apply, please contact the Programme Administrator:

Programme Administrator
Tel: +44 (0)121 414 4061 
Email: [email protected]

Fee if taken as a stand alone course

£675

Entry requirements if taken as a stand alone course

Evidence of ability to study at M Level if undertaking the module as part of CPD stand alone option.

133214| University of Birmingham| Mixed Methods Research Designs|

Over the past 25 years there have been numerous calls for increased methodological diversity in integrating quantitative and qualitative research approaches which has spawned varied typologies of a mixed method design.

There are various types of mixed method including distinguishing features which focus upon methods of data collection and analysis, the relative contribution of quantitative and qualitative, and how these are sequenced within an overall research design. Hanson et al (2005) consider that mixed methods research has become increasingly popular and maybe now considered as a legitimate, stand-alone research design within health and social sciences. Examples of mixed methods research include the development of health surveys, assessing health outcomes, assessing health service provision and healthy quality improvement initiatives.

The distinct advantage of a mixed method approach is that research findings can be enriched by the effective utilisation of concurrent and sequential quantitative and qualitative data which in turn allows researchers to gain a much deeper understanding of the phenomenon of interest.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the module you should be able to:

  • Critically evaluate the key concepts involved within mixed methods research designs in relation to its origins and philosophy of knowledge.
  • Critically appraise and interpret the different methods and techniques of mixed methods research.
  • Explore the essential research skills in mixed methods research for research projects designed for a health and social sciences population.
  • Critically consider the challenges in both the presentation and dissemination of mixed methods research in relation to reliability, validity and ethical consideration.

Credits

20 credits

Module Attendance Required

40 hours

Module Dates

  • Study day 1 - Thursday 07/02/2019
  • Study day 2 - Friday  08/02/2019
  • Study day 3 – Monday 11/02/2019
  • Study day 4 – Tuesday 12/02/2019
  • Study day 5 – Wednesday 13/02/2019

Assessment dates

  • Essay submission: 27 March 2019
  • Presentation: 3 April 2019

Assessment 

A 2000 word written assignment (70%) and a powerpoint presentation of a research proposal utilising a specific mixed method approach to a current health care related issue (30%).

Academics involved in the delivery of this module

Caroline Bradbury-Jones

Stand Alone Course

This module can be taken as a stand alone course if required. For more information or to apply please contact the Programme Administrator:

Tel: +44 (0)121 414 6014 
Email: [email protected]

133207| University of Birmingham| Brain Injury|

Module Overview
This module describes the neuropsychiatric aspects of brain injury. It includes lectures on the different causes of brain injury and their neurobehavioural consequences. It will address specifically the recognition and management of psychiatric syndromes (eg depression, abulia, irritability, psychosis, personality change) in the context of brain injury. There will also be sessions on interdisciplinary working, the management of brain-injured people and on the ethical and legal challenges. You will also be looking at service development in brain injury.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of the module you should be able to:

  • Describe the basic physiology and epidemiology of brain injury;
  • Describe and understand the mental health consequences of brain injury and their investigation and management;
  • Legal and ethical issues in providing care for people with brain injury.

Credits
20 credits

Module Attendance Required
10 sessions of 2.5 to 3 hours (with a break)

Module Dates
2017/18 dates
15 March – 31 June 2018 (1 lecture every Thursday afternoon)

Assessment
One 3000 word essay 

Academics involved in the delivery of this module

  • Professor Hugh Rickards - Consultant in Neuropsychiatry and Programme Lead
  • Dr Rafey Faruqui, Consultant Neuropsychiatrist, National Brain Injury Centre, Northampton and University of Birmingham Honorary lecturer
  • Most lectures are from visiting consultants, professionals and researchers in the field.

Stand Alone Course

This module can also be taken as a stand-alone course if required. If taken as an individual module you will receive a certificate of attendance for CPD purposes.

Fee if taken as a stand alone course
For information on fees please contact the Programme Administrator. Please note - no masters level credits are available for this module unless taken as part of the MSc, PGDip or PGCert in Clinical Neuropsychiatry programme. 

Entry requirements if taken as a stand alone course
For information on requirements please contact the Programme Administrator. You are encouraged to get in contact no later than 6 weeks before the start date of the module to ensure we can consider your application.

More information
Please contact the Postgraduate Administrator, +44 (0)121 415 8118, [email protected]

133202| Multiple Locations| Radiation Physics|

This module will give you a broad knowledge of medical physics as it applies to the clinical practice of radiotherapy. Theoretical as well as practical aspects of handling and calculating radiation doses will be covered. The course is modelled on the physics syllabus of the FRCR Part I examinations and will therefore provide suitable preparation for this professional examination.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of the module you should be able to:

  • Explain the basic physics principles that underpin radiotherapy, e.g. types of radiation, atomic structure etc;
  • Explain the principles of radiation dosimetry;
  • Explain the principles of therapeutic radiation physics including X-rays, electron beam physics, radioactive sources, use of unsealed sources and Brachytherapy;
  • Describe how to use radiotherapy equipment both for tumour localisation, planning and treatment;
  • Define quality assurance and quality control, in the context of radiotherapy and the legal requirements;
  • Explain the principles and practice of radiation protection, dose limits, screening and protection mechanisms.

Credits
20 credits

Module Dates
2018/19 dates
Students must attend both weeks.
11 - 15 February 2019 - Radiation Physics I
18 - 22 March 2019 - Radiation Physics II

Assessment
After the end of the first week of teaching, the students will be required to complete a series of structured question problems, based around the requirements of the FRCR Part I examinations and contribute 30% towards the overall module mark. At the start of the second week a tutorial will go over these questions, then later that week, students will do an MCQ exam based on the first weeks teaching (20%). At the end of the second week of teaching, students will have to complete a critical appraisal based written assignment (50%).

Academics involved in the delivery of this module

  • Dr Stuart Green, Head of Medical Physics, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Trust
  • Hon Professor of Radiological Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham 

Stand Alone Course
This module can be taken as a stand alone course if required. For further information please contact:

Programme Administrator

Tel: +44 (0)121 414 3803
Email: [email protected]

Fee if taken as a stand alone course
£1100

Entry requirements if taken as a stand alone course
6 months oncology experience and holding a degree, preferably a 2.1 or equivalent qualifications in an appropriate medical/scientific subject.

133196| University of Birmingham| Palliative Care and Cancer Patients|

The theoretical and practical issues applicable to the palliation of symptoms for patients with advanced cancer will be studied. The module will look to improve the competence of practioners delivering high quality palliative care in emotion situations. The Module is divided into three strands, Pain - the practical and holisitc management thereof; Psychology, including sessions on cognitive behavioural therapy and screening for psychological distress; and Control of Symptoms such as Cachexia, Breathlessness and Oncological emergencies.

Credits
20 credits

Module Dates
2018/19 dates
13 – 17 May 2019

Assessment
Oral presentation and 300 word written assignment

Academics involved in the delivery of this module

  • Dr Jennifer Pascoe, Consultant Medical Oncologist
  • Dr Lu Birch, Palliative Care Consultant
  • Dr Iñigo Tolosa, Consultant NHS Clinical Psychologist

Stand Alone Course
This module can be taken as a stand alone course if required. For further information please contact:

Programme Administrator 
Tel: +44 (0)121 414 3803
Email: [email protected]  

Fee if taken as a stand alone course: £1100 

This course is available without the assessment/credits if preferred

Entry requirements if taken as a stand alone course

6 months oncology experience and holding a degree, preferably a 2.1 or equivalent qualifications in an appropriate medical/scientific subject.

133195| University of Birmingham| https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/taught/med/pg-modules/omics-techniques-and-technologies-and-their-application-to-genomic-medicine.as|

Module overview

This module explores current genomics techniques used for DNA sequencing (e.g. targeted approaches, whole exome and whole genome sequencing) and RNA sequencing, using highly parallel methodologies, together with current technologies routinely used to investigate genomic variation in the clinical setting. This module will introduce the bioinformatics approaches required for the analysis of genomic data. The module will also cover the use of array based methodologies and RNA sequencing in estimating levels of protein expression, micro RNAs and long non–coding RNAs. An introduction to metabolomics and proteomics, which are important for the functional interpretation of genomic data and discovery of disease biomarkers will also be included. Students will also learn about the strategies employed to evaluate pathogenicity of variants for clinical reporting.

Credits

15 Masters level credits

Module attendance required

Teaching delivered as a five-day block

Module dates

First iteration - September 2018
Second iteration - April 2019

Assessment

The module will be assessed via a short presentation, and an exam including short answer questions and a choice of essay. For those taking the module as a stand-alone option, you need only take the assessment if you require the University credits.

Academics involved in the delivery of this module 

Module Lead:
Dr. Yvonne Wallis (Head of Familial Cancer Section/Head of Research, Academic and Service Developments, West Midlands Regional Genetics Laboratory, Birmingham)

Dr Samantha Butler (Principle Clinical Scientist, Regional Genetics Laboratory, Birmingham)

University staff teaching:

Other NHS staff teaching:

  • Dr Dom McMullan
  • Dr Pauline Rehal
  • Dr Lisa Reali
  • Dr Samuel Clokie
  • Dr Piers Fulton
  • Dr Ana Bras Goldberg
  • Dr Richard Barber

Stand-alone module

Fee
£1000

This module can be taken as a stand-alone assessed or non-assessed course.  

You should have a good honours degree in a life sciences subject, although we will consider applicants with alternative qualifications and professional experience within the health service or other relevant background. You should either take our Fundamentals in Human Genetics and Genomics module first, or be able to show you have equivalent knowledge and understanding to enable you to benefit from this module. 

Please contact the Programme Coordinator for further information at [email protected]

133193| University of Birmingham| Genomics of Common and Rare Inherited Diseases|

Module overview

This module will initially explore the clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and treatment of a range of common and rare inherited diseases. The principles and practice of medical genetics and genomics, and the management and treatment of patients and their families will be discussed. In addition, the role of genomics in a care pathway will be examined including the patient and family perspective.

This module will explore the traditional and current approaches used to identify genes responsible for common and rare inherited diseases, focusing on the latter. Building on knowledge gained in Module 2 (Omics Techniques and Technologies), students will further explore the analytical challenges in genomics as applied to rare inherited diseases.

This module will also describe the Genomics England 100,000 Genomes Project and data infrastructure and through practical examples highlight which how patients with unmet diagnostic need will benefit from exome or whole genome sequencing.

Credits

15 Masters level credits

Module attendance required

Teaching delivered one day each week for 5 consecutive weeks.

Module dates

First iteration - October 2018
Second iteration - May 2019

Assessment

The module will be assessed via a poster presentation, a 3000-word essay assignment and an exam with short answer questions.  For those taking the module as a stand-alone option, you need only take the assessment if you require the University credits.

Academics involved in the delivery of this module 

Module Lead:
Professor Tim Barrett (Professor of Paediatrics, University of Birmingham and Honorary Consultant Paediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Birmingham Children’s Hospital)

Other University staff teaching:

NHS staff teaching:

  • Prof Elizabeth Hughes
  • Dr William Bradlow
  • Dr Peter Marks
  • Dr Samantha Butler
  • Dr Tom Fowler (Deputy Chief Scientist and Director of Public Health at Genomics England)

Stand-alone

Fee
£1000

This module can be taken as a stand-alone assessed or non-assessed course.

You should have a good honours degree in a life sciences subject, although we will consider applicants with alternative qualifications and professional experience within the health service or other relevant background. You should either take Fundamentals in Human Genetics and Genomics and Omics Techniques and Technologies and their Application to Genomic Medicine first, or be able to show you have equivalent knowledge and understanding to enable you to benefit from this module. 

Please contact the Programme Administrator for further information at [email protected]

133192| University of Birmingham| Genomics in Cancer Pathology|

Module overview

This module covers the molecular mechanisms that underlie cancer development, growth and metastasis, and the differences between different cancers. It will explore the different molecular and cellular actions of anti-cancer treatments, the genomic factors affecting response and resistance to treatment, and the research approaches to anti-cancer drug design and development. Broad situations which confer a high cancer risk to a person and/or to other members of the same family will be discussed in the context of how genomic information may be integrated into cancer screening programmes, and the impact this may have on the patient and their family. This module will also prepare students to interrogate the cancer data sets from the 100,000 Genomes Project if relevant for their research project.

Credits

15 Masters level credits

Module attendance required

Teaching delivered one day each week for five consecutive weeks.

Module dates

First iteration - November 2018
Second iteration - June 2019

Assessment

The module will be assessed via a poster presentation, a 3000-word essay assignment and short-answer/case study problems completed in your own time. For those taking the module as a stand-alone option, you need only take the assessment if you require the University credits.

Academics involved in the delivery of this module 

Module Lead:
Professor Paul Murray (Professor of Molecular Pathology, University of Birmingham)

Other University staff teaching:

NHS staff teaching:

  • Dr Philippe Taniere
  • Dr Rachel Brown
  • Dr Graham Halford
  • Dr Brendan Sullivan
  • Dr Ana Bras Goldberg
  • Dr Abeer Shaaban
  • Dr Matthew Smith
  • Dr Zbigniew Rudzki
  • Dr Pauline Rehal
  • Dr Samantha Butler

Stand-alone module

Fee
£1000 

This module can be taken as a stand-alone assessed or non-assessed course. 

You should have a good honours degree in a life sciences subject, although we will consider applicants with alternative qualifications and professional experience within the health service or other relevant background. You should either take An Introduction to Human Genetics and Genomics and module 2 Omics Techniques and their Application to Genomic Medicine first, or be able to show you have equivalent knowledge and understanding to enable you to benefit from this module. 

Please contact the Programme Administrator for further information at [email protected]

133191| University of Birmingham| Fundamentals in Human Genetics and Genomics|

Module overview

This module will cover the structure and variations in the human genomics, including fundamental principles of genetics and genomics. Students undertaking this module will review the architecture of the human genome and the functional units embedded in it. In addition this module will cover DNA sequence variation and how variation is structured across the genome explaining the principles of linkage disequilibrium and its extent in human populations (e.g. HapMap project). Students will also cover aspects of gene regulation and chromatin structure and understand the importance of genotype to phenotype correlation.

Credits

15 Masters level credits

Module attendance required

Teaching delivered as a five-day block

Module dates

First iteration - September 2018
Second iteration - March 2019

Assessment

The module will be assessed via an extended (3000-word) essay and an exam made up of short-answer questions.  For those taking the module as a stand-alone option, you need only take the assessment if you require University credits.

Academics involved in the delivery of this module 

Module Lead: 
Prof. Ferenc Müller (Professor of Developmental Genetics at the University of Birmingham)

Other University staff teaching:

NHS staff teaching on the module:

  • Dr Samantha Butler
  • Dr Lily Islam
  • Dr Helen Cox
  • Dr Peter Marks

Stand-alone module

Fee
£1000

This module can be taken as a stand-alone assessed or non-assessed course.  To apply, students should have a good honours degree in a life sciences subject, although we will consider applicants with alternative qualifications and professional experience within the health service or other relevant background.

Please contact the Programme Coordinator for further information at [email protected]

133188| University of Birmingham| Cellular and Molecular Basis of Cancer - MRes|

Module overview

This is the first module on the MRes Cancer Sciences programme and is taken alongside MSc Clinical Oncology students.

The module aims to provide an update on the cellular lesions underlying the development of cancer.The module provides an essential underpinning to the subsequent modules by ensuring that you have the necessary background knowledge of recent advances in molecular medicine.

Topics Covered - Oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes, mechanisms of metastasis and apoptosis. The role of viruses, environmental carcinogens and chromosomal alterations in cancers will be discussed..

Credits

20 Masters level credits

Module attendance required

Compulsory introductory module taken in an intensive one week block at the start of the programme.

Module dates

2018/19
8-12 October 2018

Assesment

MCQ examination - 12 November (1 hour in the morning)
3000 word written assignment

Academics involved in the delivery of this module 

Organised by Dr Sally Roberts, School of Cancer Sciences and taught by senior academic staff within the School of Cancer Sciences.

Stand alone course

This module is available as a stand alone course. Please contact the programme administrater on +44 (0)121 414 3803
[email protected] for further details.

133186| Multiple Locations| Cancer Therapy and Management|

This module will explain the scientific basis on which cytotoxic and novel treatment strategies for cancer have been and are being developed.  An overview of how radiation affects cells and how this is utilised in radiotherapy will also be given.  This conceptual knowledge will be integrated with information on the systemic and radiological management of particular cancers and detailed discussions take place on how particular cases might be treated and novel approaches integrated with current best practice. 

Credits
20 credits

Module Attendance Required
2 block weeks

Module Dates
2018/19 dates 
30 April – 3 May plus 10-14 June 2019

Assessment
MCQ examination (10 June - 1 hour ) plus 1000 written assignment

Academics involved in the delivery of this module
Dr Jean Assender, Lecturer Cancer Studies and Clinical Oncology Programme Lead, and Dr Emilio Porfiri, Senior Lecturer Cancer Studies and NHS Consultant

Stand Alone Course 
This module can be taken as a stand alone course if required.

Fee if taken as a stand alone course
£1100

This course is available without the assessment/credits if preferred.

For further information please contact: 

Programme Administrator 
Tel: +44 (0)121 414 3803
Email: [email protected]

133187| Multiple Locations| Cancer Therapy and Management|

This module will explain the scientific basis on which cytotoxic and novel treatment strategies for cancer have been and are being developed.  An overview of how radiation affects cells and how this is utilised in radiotherapy will also be given.  This conceptual knowledge will be integrated with information on the systemic and radiological management of particular cancers and detailed discussions take place on how particular cases might be treated and novel approaches integrated with current best practice. 

Credits
20 credits

Module Attendance Required
2 block weeks

Module Dates
2018/19 dates 
30 April – 3 May plus 10-14 June 2019

Assessment
MCQ examination (10 June - 1 hour ) plus 1000 written assignment

Academics involved in the delivery of this module
Dr Jean Assender, Lecturer Cancer Studies and Clinical Oncology Programme Lead, and Dr Emilio Porfiri, Senior Lecturer Cancer Studies and NHS Consultant

Stand Alone Course 
This module can be taken as a stand alone course if required.

Fee if taken as a stand alone course
£1100

This course is available without the assessment/credits if preferred.

For further information please contact: 

Programme Administrator 
Tel: +44 (0)121 414 3803
Email: [email protected]

133184| Multiple Locations| Bioinformatics, Interpretation and Data Quality Assurance in Genome Analysis|

Module overview

The module will cover the fundamental principles of informatics, the impact of bioinformatics on clinical genomics, and the ethical, legal and social issues that need to be considered. Students will be expected to be able to find and use major genomic and genetic data resources; use software packages and analysis tools for big data and undertake literature searches to critically assess, annotate and interpret findings from sequence data and genetic variants. Theoretical sessions will be coupled with practical exercises involving the analysis and annotation of predefined data sets.

This module will equip the student with the essential skills to analyse genomic data, applying professional best practice guidelines. Upon completion of this module students will be able to understand how bioinformatics is used to analyse, interpret and report genomic data in a clinical context. Students will also be equipped to utilise the 100,000 Genomes Project data set if relevant for their research project.

Credits

15 Masters level credits

Module attendance required

Teaching delivered over 2 weeks (March 2019) or over one day each week for five consecutive weeks (June 2019).

Module dates

First iteration - March 2019
Second iteration - June 2019

Assessment

The module will be assessed via a short presentation, and an exam made up of multiple-choice questions and a choice of essay. For those taking the module as a stand-alone option, you need only take the assessment if you require the University credits.

Academics involved in the delivery of this module 

Module Lead:
Professor Jean-Baptiste Cazier (University of Birmingham Chair of Bioinformatics; Director Designate of the Centre for Computational Biology)

Other University staff teaching:

NHS staff teaching:

  • Dr Samantha Butler

Stand-alone module

Fee
£1000

This module can be taken as a stand-alone assessed or non-assessed course.   

You should have a good honours degree in a life sciences subject, although we will consider applicants with alternative qualifications and professional experience within the health service or other relevant background. You should either take  (An Introduction to Human Genetics and Genomics) and (Omics Techniques and their Application to Genomic Medicine) first, or be able to show you have equivalent knowledge and understanding to enable you to benefit from this module. 

Please contact the Programme Administrator for further information at [email protected] 

133185| Multiple Locations| Bioinformatics, Interpretation and Data Quality Assurance in Genome Analysis|

Module overview

The module will cover the fundamental principles of informatics, the impact of bioinformatics on clinical genomics, and the ethical, legal and social issues that need to be considered. Students will be expected to be able to find and use major genomic and genetic data resources; use software packages and analysis tools for big data and undertake literature searches to critically assess, annotate and interpret findings from sequence data and genetic variants. Theoretical sessions will be coupled with practical exercises involving the analysis and annotation of predefined data sets.

This module will equip the student with the essential skills to analyse genomic data, applying professional best practice guidelines. Upon completion of this module students will be able to understand how bioinformatics is used to analyse, interpret and report genomic data in a clinical context. Students will also be equipped to utilise the 100,000 Genomes Project data set if relevant for their research project.

Credits

15 Masters level credits

Module attendance required

Teaching delivered over 2 weeks (March 2019) or over one day each week for five consecutive weeks (June 2019).

Module dates

First iteration - March 2019
Second iteration - June 2019

Assessment

The module will be assessed via a short presentation, and an exam made up of multiple-choice questions and a choice of essay. For those taking the module as a stand-alone option, you need only take the assessment if you require the University credits.

Academics involved in the delivery of this module 

Module Lead:
Professor Jean-Baptiste Cazier (University of Birmingham Chair of Bioinformatics; Director Designate of the Centre for Computational Biology)

Other University staff teaching:

NHS staff teaching:

  • Dr Samantha Butler

Stand-alone module

Fee
£1000

This module can be taken as a stand-alone assessed or non-assessed course.   

You should have a good honours degree in a life sciences subject, although we will consider applicants with alternative qualifications and professional experience within the health service or other relevant background. You should either take  (An Introduction to Human Genetics and Genomics) and (Omics Techniques and their Application to Genomic Medicine) first, or be able to show you have equivalent knowledge and understanding to enable you to benefit from this module. 

Please contact the Programme Administrator for further information at [email protected] 

133183| University of Birmingham| Applications of Genomics in Infectious Disease|

Module overview

Modern high-throughput sequencing methodologies can provide unprecedented specificity for diagnosing infectious diseases and tracking the spread of an outbreak. Following introductory lectures about the global burden and transmission routes of infectious diseases, you will learn about the basic biology and genomics of bacteria, fungi and viruses, features associated with pathogenicity, the basis for antibiotic susceptility and the problem of antibiotic resistance. Clinical examples discussed will include tuberculosis, human immunodeficiency virus, Salmonella and Ebola.

Credits

15 Masters level credits

Module attendance required

Teaching delivered one day each week for five consecutive weeks.

Module dates

First iteration -  February 2019
Second iteration - November 2019

Assessment

The module will be assessed via a short presentation, and an exam made up of short answer questions and a choice of essay. For those taking the module as a stand-alone option, you need only take the assessment if you require the University credits.

Academics involved in the delivery of this module 

Module Leads:

Other University staff teaching

NHS staff

  • Dr Erasmus Smit

Other staff

  • Prof Alexander Tarr, University of Nottingham

Stand-alone module


Fee
£1000

This module can be taken as a stand-alone assessed or non-assessed course.  

You should have a good honours degree in a life sciences subject, although we will consider applicants with alternative qualifications and professional experience within the health service or other relevant background. You should either take Fundamentals in Human Genetics and Genomics  and Omics Techniques and their Application to Genomic Medicine first, or be able to show you have equivalent knowledge and understanding to enable you to benefit from this module. 

Please contact the Programme Administrator for further information at [email protected] 

133182| University of Birmingham| Advanced Bioinformatics|

Module overview

This optional module will extend your knowledge and capabilities for bioinformatic analysis of genomic data, beyond that achieved in the core Bioinformatics module. You will gain greater understanding of the different approaches to mapping and alignment of sequence data, learn how to use programming and scripting via command line and the Galaxy interface and learn approaches for detection of structural or copy number changes, and for analysis of epigenetic changes.

Much of the learning on the module is based on practical exercises and to ensure optimal teaching support for these sessions, the number of places is capped at 10.

This module is significantly more demanding than Module 3 (Bioinformatics, Interpretation and Data Quality Assurance in Genome Analysis) and students are strongly encouraged to discuss their suitability with module staff prior to enroling.

Credits

15 Masters level credits

Module attendance required

Teaching delivered one day each week for 5 consecutive weeks.

Module dates

May 2019

Assessment

The module will be assessed via a short software presentation, and an exam made up of multiple-choice questions and a choice of essay. For those taking the module as a stand-alone option, you need only take the assessment if you require the University credits. 

Academics involved in the delivery of this module 

Module Lead:
Professor Jean-Baptiste Cazier (University of Birmingham Chair of Bioinformatics; Director Designate of the Centre for Computational Biology)

 University staff:

 

Stand-alone

Fee
£1000 

This module can be taken as a stand-alone assessed or non-assessed course.  

You should have a good honours degree in a life sciences subject, although we will consider applicants with alternative qualifications and professional experience within the health service or other relevant background. 

You should either take Fundamentals in Human Genetics and Genomics ,  Omics Techniques and Technologies and their Application to Genomic Medicine and Bioinformatics, Interpretation and Data Quality Assurance in Genome Analysis first, or be able to show you have equivalent knowledge and understanding to enable you to benefit from this module.

Please contact the Programme Administrator for further information at [email protected]

133175| University of Birmingham| Sociology and Social Policy|

Sociology and Social Policy 
This module takes a broad view of health, and causes of health inequality; this module looks in particular at the social influences behind ill health and social solutions that might be offered. Mixtures of tutoring methods are used. 

Learning Outcomes 
By the end of the module you should be able to: 
1. understand the principles of sociology as applied to medicine and health-related behaviour 
2. understand the role of medicine in society 
3. understand and apply the principles of social policy as applied to health and health care 
4. understand and critically explore explanations for inequalities in health. 

Credits 
10 credits 

Module Attendance Required 
1 block week of teaching 

Module Dates
2018/19
8 – 12 April 2019

Assessment 
One written assignment

Module Coordinator 
Dr Antje Lindenmeyer

Stand Alone Course 
This module can be taken as a standalone course if required. To apply, please the Programme Coordinator on 0121 414 7577 or at [email protected]. All applications must be received by a minimum of one month before the start date of the module. For further information on fees or entry requirements, please contact the Programme Administrator. The course can be taken as an assessed or non assessed week.

133173| Multiple Locations| Research Methods (Distance Learning)|

Module Overview

This module covers the techniques needed to critically appraise published research, and carry out a piece of original research. Topics include the scientific method applied to human services, literature search techniques, research design, sampling, the organisation of a research project, research ethics, measurement techniques, the analysis of qualitative and quantitative data, the presentation of results, and dissemination.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the module you should be able to:

  • Complete a literature search on a defined topic.
  • Prepare a research proposal with an appropriate research design, measurement, sample, and consideration of ethical issues sufficient to be approved by an ethical committee.
  • Critically appraise a recent published research paper.
  • Analyse a set of qualitative data.
  • Analyse a set of quantitative data.

Credits

20 credits

This module can be taken as a stand alone course if required. To apply, please contact Programme Administrator, tel 0121 414 4515, email [email protected].

Module Attendance Required

Distance learning supplemented by individual tutorials.

Module Dates

The module is run twice every year.

Session 1 - October to December
Session 2 - January to March

Please contact [email protected] for exact dates.

Assessment

One 3000-word essay

Academics involved in the delivery of this module

Dr Qulsom Fazil - Lecturer in Disability Studies and Behaviourial Science, Module Co-ordinator for the Research Methods Module

133174| Multiple Locations| Research Methods (Distance Learning)|

Module Overview

This module covers the techniques needed to critically appraise published research, and carry out a piece of original research. Topics include the scientific method applied to human services, literature search techniques, research design, sampling, the organisation of a research project, research ethics, measurement techniques, the analysis of qualitative and quantitative data, the presentation of results, and dissemination.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the module you should be able to:

  • Complete a literature search on a defined topic.
  • Prepare a research proposal with an appropriate research design, measurement, sample, and consideration of ethical issues sufficient to be approved by an ethical committee.
  • Critically appraise a recent published research paper.
  • Analyse a set of qualitative data.
  • Analyse a set of quantitative data.

Credits

20 credits

This module can be taken as a stand alone course if required. To apply, please contact Programme Administrator, tel 0121 414 4515, email [email protected].

Module Attendance Required

Distance learning supplemented by individual tutorials.

Module Dates

The module is run twice every year.

Session 1 - October to December
Session 2 - January to March

Please contact [email protected] for exact dates.

Assessment

One 3000-word essay

Academics involved in the delivery of this module

Dr Qulsom Fazil - Lecturer in Disability Studies and Behaviourial Science, Module Co-ordinator for the Research Methods Module

133169| ONCORE ePD| Leadership and Management Skills ~ Veterinary Performance Appraisals|

A robust appraisal process that provides opportunity for two-way, constructive feedback, insight into opportunity for staff development, and ensures that team members are working towards practice goals; is essential for staff progression and satisfaction, as well as the health of the practice as a business.

Do you feel as though you get the very best out of the appraisal process with your staff? Do they look forward to the opportunity for feedback and development? Do you use appraisals to effectively manage staff performance?

This module will offer you the chance to explore the fundamental principles of running performance appraisals within your team, so that you and your staff can get the very best out of the process.

133167| ONCORE ePD| Theatre Practice ~ a Guide to Effective Theatre Management|

The aim of effective theatre practice and management is to provide a sterile and safe environment in which to undertake surgery with consideration to reducing the risks to the patient and staff.

The course will explore and focus on the key factors in managing an efficient operating theatre, and will cover many topics from all aspects of theatre practice and management to help you to run a theatre effectively, and achieve guidelines set within the RCVS practice standards.

Participants will be able to share their knowledge base and protocols with a view to gaining an understanding of the areas of strength and weakness in the delivery and maintenance of their current practice protocols.

This will lead to discussions on how improvements can be made to achieve best practice standards within the remits of their own individual practices, and develop standard theatre operating procedures based upon this learning.

133164| University of Birmingham| Modelling for Health Economics|

An understanding of the uses and limitations of modelling is an essential part of the toolkit of any Health Economist who is involved with Economic Evaluation, either as an analyst or a receiver/user of economic analysis. This module goes beyond the introductory sessions in the Introduction to Health Economics module and covers the full range of model types that are appropriate for use in Health Economic analysis (such as Markov models, transmission dynamic models and Bayesian approaches to modelling).

Credits
20 credits

Module Attendance Required
One week block of teaching

Module Dates
2018/19 dates
25 – 1 March 2019 

Please note: if you are taking this module as part of the MSc Health Economics and Health Policy programme you will need to have completed the Statistics for Health Economics II module.

Assessment
Two written assignments each 50% of total weighting.

  1. critical appraisal of an existing model-based analysis (maximum 3000 words)
  2. an exercise involving construction, analysis, and reporting of the results of a model (maximum 2000 words for the report plus the model in appropriate software)

Please note: these assessments will change in 2018/19. The critical appraisal assignment will be replaced by an examination worth 40% of the total weighting, and the second exercise will be worth 60% of the total weighting.

Academics involved in the delivery of this module

Stand Alone Course

This module can be taken as a stand alone course if required. This module can be taken on a stand alone basis however it will not be assessed and no credits will be awarded. 

Fee if taken as a stand alone course
2017/18 module prices

UK/EU - £1550 (Public Sector), £2700 (Private Sector)
Non UK/EU - £2774

Entry requirements if taken as a stand alone course
Previous knowledge of health economics and statistics equivalent to that obtained in the Introduction to Health Economics and Statistics for Health Economics modules. All applicants will be required to discuss eligibility with the Course Director at the time of applying.

Register for this course now via the university online shop.

More information

For queries about the MSc programmes, please contact:  Caroline Harwood (Postgraduate Administrative Officer) or Dr Louise Jackson (Programme Lead) 

For queries about short courses, please contact Dr Patrick Moore (Deputy Programme Lead)  0121 414 3056, [email protected]

.

133160| University of Birmingham| Introduction to Leadership and Management for Health|

Introduction to Leadership and Management for Health 
This module provides an introduction to management for students from a range of professional and academic backgrounds. Its aim is to examine the main components of management in a way that is accessible to students with different levels of experience of working in organisations. Using health care organisations as a focus it explores the key elements of managing self, managing teams and managing organisations to enable students to develop a critical perspective on organisation. It focuses on the use of theory and research to build an understanding of management and leadership in organisations. 

Learning outcomes 
By the end of the module you should be able to: 
1. Discuss broad conceptual approaches to the study of management 
2. Examine management of self; management of teams; management of the organisation as a framework for the practice of management. 
3. Analyse critically specific theories of management and leadership and their utility in increasing understanding of organisations 
4. Examine the rationale for and effectiveness of change strategies utilised in health care organisations. 
5. Evaluate critically the concept of organisational culture and its applications in managing health care. 
6. Critique relevant research to inform an analysis of health care organisations 

Credits 
10 credits 

Module Attendance Required 
1 block week of teaching 

Module Dates 
2018/19
3 - 7 June 2019

Assessment 
One written assignment 

Module Coordinator 
Dr Ross Millar

Stand Alone Course 
This module can be taken as a standalone course if required. The module can be taken as an assessed or non assessed week To apply, please contact contact the Programme Administrator, 0121 414 7577, or at [email protected]. Applications must be received a minimum of one month before the start date of the module. For further information on fees or entry requirements, please contact the Programme Administrator.

133151| University of Birmingham| Human factors in healthcare|

Module overview

This 20 credit module forms one part of the Post Graduate Certificate programme in Multidisciplinary Healthcare Simulation. This module will provide you with an understanding of non-technical skills vital to enable the exploration of these crucial concepts in multidisciplinary healthcare simulation teaching and learning.

Credits

20 Masters level credits

Module attendance required

The formal taught component is delivered over 3 full days.

Module dates

2018/19 dates
Monday 25 – Wednesday 27th February 2019

Assesment

Methods of assessment comprise; an oral presentation and a 3000 word essay.

Academics involved in the delivery of this module 

The teaching will be delivered by Dr Sandeep Randhawa, Academic General Practitioner with a specialist interest and expertise in medical education.

Stand-alone course for CPD

This module can be taken as a stand alone course if required.

Fee if taken as a stand alone course - £600

To apply please contact:

Programme Administrator 
Tel: +44 (0) 121 414 2677
Email: [email protected]

133149| Multiple Locations| Healthcare Simulation Delivery|

Module overview

This 20 credit module forms one part of the Post Graduate Certificate in Multidisciplinary Healthcare Simulation. The aims of this module are:

To provide you with:

  • An understanding of the process for creating an effect scenario that can be used in simulation training.
  • Knowledge of the available technologies and how to ‘drive’ the technology. 

Additionally you will explore all roles within the simulation faculty and how they contribute to the fidelity of multidisciplinary health care simulation as well as the principles of debriefing a simulation scenario.

Credits

20 Masters level credits

Module attendance required

The formal taught component is delivered over 3 full days in 2 blocks of teaching (1+2 days) with a 3 week break between blocks. The break in teaching allows you time for reflection and preparation of simulation scenarios in advance of the simulation sessions held in the specialist simulation suite.

Module dates

2018/19
Wednesday 1 May 2019
Tuesday 4 and Wednesday 5 June 2019

Assesment

Methods of assessment comprise: creation and application of 3 simulation scenarios, a reflective portfolio and a 3000 word evidence based essay.

Academics involved in the delivery of this module 

The teaching will be delivered by Dr Sandeep Randhawa, Academic General Practitioner with a specialist interest and expertise in medical education.

Stand-alone course for CPD

This module can be taken as a stand alone course if required.

Fee if taken as a stand alone course - £600

To apply please contact:

Programme Administrator 
Tel: +44 (0)121 414 2677
Email: [email protected] 

133150| Multiple Locations| Healthcare Simulation Delivery|

Module overview

This 20 credit module forms one part of the Post Graduate Certificate in Multidisciplinary Healthcare Simulation. The aims of this module are:

To provide you with:

  • An understanding of the process for creating an effect scenario that can be used in simulation training.
  • Knowledge of the available technologies and how to ‘drive’ the technology. 

Additionally you will explore all roles within the simulation faculty and how they contribute to the fidelity of multidisciplinary health care simulation as well as the principles of debriefing a simulation scenario.

Credits

20 Masters level credits

Module attendance required

The formal taught component is delivered over 3 full days in 2 blocks of teaching (1+2 days) with a 3 week break between blocks. The break in teaching allows you time for reflection and preparation of simulation scenarios in advance of the simulation sessions held in the specialist simulation suite.

Module dates

2018/19
Wednesday 1 May 2019
Tuesday 4 and Wednesday 5 June 2019

Assesment

Methods of assessment comprise: creation and application of 3 simulation scenarios, a reflective portfolio and a 3000 word evidence based essay.

Academics involved in the delivery of this module 

The teaching will be delivered by Dr Sandeep Randhawa, Academic General Practitioner with a specialist interest and expertise in medical education.

Stand-alone course for CPD

This module can be taken as a stand alone course if required.

Fee if taken as a stand alone course - £600

To apply please contact:

Programme Administrator 
Tel: +44 (0)121 414 2677
Email: [email protected] 

133148| University of Birmingham| Health Protection 2|

Health Protection 2 
The primary aim of this module is to develop advanced and critical understanding of the nature of communicable diseases and non-communicable environmental hazards, and enable you to develop strategies for appropriate interventions. 

Learning outcomes 
By the end of this module you should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the impact of the wider determinants of health on the distribution and course of communicable diseases and non-communicable hazards.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the epidemiology, public health impact, prevention and control of important communicable diseases in the UK, including cluster and outbreak management.
  • Apply the principles of risk analysis to health in relation to long-term exposure to non-infectious environmental hazards
  • Describe the nature, distribution, extent and public health impact of key environmental health issues (including environmental toxins, radiation, noise and waste management) in the UK
  • Understand key concepts of environmental public health tracking such as
        • surveillance of hazards, exposures and health outcomes
        • integration and analysis of key data to identify effective interventions
        • basic toxicology and bio-monitoring
        • horizon scanning
        • indicator development and mapping
        • disease cluster investigations

Credits 
10 credits 

Module Attendance Required 
1 block week 
Students must have previously attended the Health Protection 1 module or its equivalent. 

Module Dates 
2018/19
18 – 22 March 2019

Assessment 
One unseen examination  

Module Coordinator 
Prof Harsh Duggal 

Stand Alone Course 
This module can be taken as a standalone course. It can be assessed or non assessed. To apply, please contact the Programme Coordinator on 0121 414 7577 or at [email protected]. All applications must be received a minimum of one month before the start date of the module. For further information on fees or entry requirements, please contact the Programme Administrator 

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