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University of the West of England, Bristol Featured Continued Professional Development

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Ulster University Featured Continued Professional Development

Professional Development Programs Worldwide

A database of Continuing Professional Development programs covering ALL subject areas!

Are you looking for a course to further your career? Or perhaps you’re looking to develop the skills of your employees? You’ve come to the right place!

FindCPD.com is a brand new site that brings together professional development courses in all subjects into a single easy-to-search database.

Latest CPD Courses
68054| Open Futures| Cookit 1 day workshop incorporating CIEH Level 2 Food Safety Qualification|

A practical hands-on workshop, for a maximum of 20 teachers to assist with the delivery of cookit. This course is accredited by the CIEH (Chartered Institute for Environmental Health) and is OFQUAL (Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation) regulated.

Participants will take a multiple choice exam paper and receive OFQUAL endorsed certification on both successful completion of the course and attaining the required pass level threshold. (The examination is externally marked by the CIEH). An additional tailored in-school follow up day is available to book, enabling participants to fully embed the theory of food safety and practice within their school (subject to availablity).

This qualification provides learners with the knowledge and skills required to operate safely within food handling environments.

68053| Engineering Institute of Technology| Professional Certificate of Competency in Specification and Technical Writing|

COURSE OBJECTIVES:


You will learn how to:

  • Systematically design and write accurate and comprehensive technical specifications
  • Write realistic specifications, thereby improving project management and performance
  • Write clear and concise formal reports, equipment manuals and other technical documentation
  • Develop effective communication with technical as well as non-technical staff at all levels (from top management within the organisation to the end user in the home environment)
  • Brainstorm and identify technical problems and solutions
  • Collect, organise, analyse and evaluate information
  • Transfer technical information into powerful graphs, flowcharts and tables
  • Translate technical documents into captivating oral presentations
     

Registrations for the September 21 intake are now open – contact us now

OVERVIEW

Researching and preparing technical documents, especially technical specifications, calls for much effort and time. This program is designed to give you step by step guidance to writing these documents in a professional manner, working within a cost and time framework.

The program will demonstrate techniques to establishing more effective communication between technical and non-technical staff and foster skills relating to problem identification and solutions, plus enhancing skills in information seeking, research and organising collected data in a non-conflicting, unambiguous manner.


COURSE OUTLINEMODULE 1: INTRODUCTION TO TECHNICAL WRITING

What is technical writing? What makes it unique?
Accuracy, Brevity and Clarity (ABCs of technical writing)
Categories of readers
Effective communication
Expressing Vs Impressing


MODULE 2: THE DEVELOPMENT PROCESS

Preparing to write
Organizing the writing
Editing and revision


MODULE 3: USE OF LANGUAGE AND WORDS

Readability
Clarifying the writing
Choice of vocabulary
Simplifying the writing


MODULE 4: THE ELEMENTS OF TECHNICAL WRITING

Technical definitions
Technical descriptions
Technical descriptions


MODULE 5: WRITING OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF TECHNICAL REPORTS

Formal report
Structure of report
Content
Conclusions
Appendices
Illustrations
References
Bibliography


MODULE 6: WRITING OF OTHER TECHNICAL DOCUMENTS

Technical memo and background reports
Technical proposal
User manuals and maintenance manuals
Journal articles


MODULE 7: OVERVIEW OF DESIGN (TECHNICAL) SPECIFICATIONS

Specifications and design
Design process
Understanding the problem and the development of engineering specifications


MODULE 8: TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION-PREREQUISITES TO WRITING

Planning to write the specification
Preparing the specification
Scope
Specification database
Basic specification information
Supporting information
Organizing input from different specialists and sources
Structure of technical specifications


MODULE 9: WRITING OF TECHNICAL SPECIFCATIONS - 1

Different types of technical specifications
Various uses of technical specifications
Creating a specification template
Writing the specification


MODULE 10: WRITING OF TECHNICAL SPECIFCATIONS - 2

Vetting the specification
Reviewing specifications
Errors in specifications
Specification approval and authorization
Hazardous materials
Conflicting requirements
Quantities
Professionalism
Do’s and don’ts of specification writing
Specification checklist


MODULE 11: PRESENTATION ASPECTS

Appearance of the document
Text and design
Visual aids
Most common formats of graphics
Illustrations
Highlighting techniques
Tips for using illustrations/graphics
Transferring information from notes to graphics/graphics to notes


MODULE 12: ORAL DELIVERY OF TECHNICAL PRESENTATIONS

What is communication?
Motivation and attention
Preparing your presentation
Make a positive impact
Using presentation aids effectively
Maximizing delivery impact
Handling difficult situations

COURSE FEES

What are the fees for my country?

The Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT) provides distance education to students located almost anywhere in the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. A full list of fees in a currency appropriate for every country would be complex to navigate and, with today’s exchange rate fluctuations, difficult to maintain. Instead we aim to give you a rapid response regarding fees that is customised to your individual circumstances.

We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student commences study. For a rapid reply to your enquiry regarding courses fees and payment options, please enquire via the below button and we will respond within 2 business days.

 

 

68052| Engineering Institute of Technology| Professional Certificate of Competency in Project Management for Engineers & Technicians|

COURSE OBJECTIVES:


By the end of this course you will be able to:

  • Create quality project plans

  • Generate effective work breakdown structures

  • Create computerised PERT and Gantt charts for your projects, add and level resources, and monitor/report on your project effectively

  • Define appropriate cost reporting mechanisms for your projects

  • Define, analyse and manage the risks associated with your projects

  • Introduce appropriate quality management procedures

  • Keep your projects on track using the 'Earned Value Analysis' method

  • Exercise an appropriate leadership style and keep team members creative and motivated

  • Avoid the pitfalls caused by a lack of understanding of the legal issues pertaining to projects

  • Use appropriate software to leverage your time and expertise

  • Deal with projects that have a large degree of inherent uncertainty and/or a strong emphasis on timely completion

    OVERVIEW

    More and more engineering and technical professionals are making career transitions from product design into project management. This, however, requires formal training and a willingness to learn new skills. All the technical know-how in the world will not deliver a project successfully, i.e. with the required level of quality, within cost constraints and on time, without proper project management skills. Unfortunately very few engineering professionals have any degree of formal project management training, which results in a great deal of personal stress as well as cost blow-outs and other woes.


    The lack of training often applies to the 'people skills' required for effectively leading the project team as well. To address this problem, the course will focus on the critical project related activities such as work breakdown, scheduling, cost control and risk management, and show how these can be performed with software to lighten the project manager's workload. The 'soft' (but equally important) aspects such as team leadership and contract law are also covered. All topics will be supplemented with practical exercises focusing primarily on the areas of electrical/electronic (including instrumentation) and mechanical engineering. If delegates wish to do so they can choose, as a basis for the practical exercises, small projects from their work environment so that they are familiar with the attributes thereof.


    COURSE OUTLINEMODULE 1: INTRODUCTION

    Project definitions
    Project life cycles
    Professional Bodies of Knowledge
    Project organizations
    Project success criteria
    Critical success factors


    MODULE 2: FUNDAMENTALS

    Quality project plans
    Work breakdown structures
    Assignment for Modules 1 & 2:
    Developing a Work Breakdown Structure


    MODULE 3: TIME MANAGEMENT

    Critical path method
    Precedence method
    Gantt charts


    MODULE 4: FUNDAMENTALS


    PERT charts
    Resource levelling
    Progress monitoring and control
    Software Selection
    Assignment for Modules 3 & 4: Generating PERT and Gantt charts


    MODULE 5: COST MANAGEMENT

    Cost estimating
    Estimating methods
    Forecast final cost
    Budgeting
    Financial control
    Change control
    Assignment for Module 5:
    Tracking cost variations


    MODULE 6: EARNED VALUE ANALYSIS AND MANAGEMENT

    EVA/EVM concept
    Definitions
    Examples and case studies
    Assignment for Module 6:
    Calculating EVA parameters


    MODULE 7: THE PROJECT MANAGER

    Management vs. Leadership
    Management/leadership theories
    Cultural influences
    Authority and power of the project manager
    Project management functions
    Project manager selection


    MODULE 8: QUALITY MANAGEMENT

    Quality concepts and definitions
    Quality management fundamentals
    Supply chain relationships
    Quality assurance systems
    ISO 9000:2005 quality system guidelines
    Assignment for Modules 7 & 8: Quality structures and processes


    MODULE 9: RISK MANAGEMENT

    Definitions
    Risk management
    Risk identification
    Risk analysis
    Risk treatment
    Assignment for Module 9: Risk analysis for given project


    MODULE 10: CONTRACTUAL ISSUES

    The Commonwealth legal system
    Attributes of contracts
    Procurement strategies
    Tendering
    Extensions and termination of contracts
    Remedies for breach
    Assignment for Module 10: Questions on selected legal case studies


    MODULE 11: EVALUATION OF FINANCING OPTIONS FOR A PROJECT

    Overview of Financial statements
    Time lines of Money
    Compounding
    Discounting
    Future Value of Money


    MODULE 12: TIME VALUE OF MONEY AND RELATED CONCEPTS

    Present Value
    Present Values of Multiple Cash Flows
    Net Present Value (NPV) of Multiple Cash Flows
    Internal Rate of Return (IRR)
    Assignment for Modules 11 & 12: Establishing Internal Rate of Return

     

    COURSE FEES

    What are the fees for my country?

    The Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT) provides distance education to students located almost anywhere in the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. A full list of fees in a currency appropriate for every country would be complex to navigate and, with today’s exchange rate fluctuations, difficult to maintain. Instead we aim to give you a rapid response regarding fees that is customised to your individual circumstances.

    We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student commences study. For a rapid reply to your enquiry regarding courses fees and payment options, please enquire via the below button and we will respond within 2 business days

68051| Engineering Institute of Technology| Professional Certificate of Competency in Structural Design for Non-Structural Engineers|

COURSE OBJECTIVES


By the end of this course you will be able to:

  • Fully understand the role of a structural engineer
  • Predict the behaviour of structural members under loading
  • Understand the concept of stress functions such as tension, compression, shear and bending
  • Perform a basic analysis of statically determinate and indeterminate structures
  • Analyse the deformation of members under Loading
  • Understand the significance of material properties in design
  • Undertake the basic design of Reinforced Cement Concrete (RCC) structures
  • Undertake the basic design of steel structures
  • Undertake the basic design of masonry structures
  • Undertake the basic design of timber structural members
      
    Next intake is scheduled for September 21, 2015 - contact us now!

OVERVIEW


Construction is the largest industry in the world. Within a Civil Engineering context, ‘construction’ may refer to bridges, dams, earthworks, foundations, offshore structures, pipelines, power stations, railways, retaining structures, roads, tunnels, waterways and water/wastewater infrastructures. within a Mechanical Engineering context, on the other hand, ‘construction’ may refer to airframes, aircraft fuselages, boilers, pressure vessels, motor coaches, railroad carriages, cranes, elevators and ships.

Anything constructed needs to be designed first. Structural Engineering deals with the analysis and design aspects required to ensure a safe, functional and economical end product. During the design process the designer may constantly interact with specialists such as architects and operational managers. Once the design is finalized, the implementation involves people to handle aspects such as statutory approvals, planning, quality assurance and material procurement. The entire exercise can be undertaken in a highly-coordinated way if everyone involves understands the terminology or ‘project language’. To understand this language fully, it is necessary to appreciate the principles of structural analysis and design.

Participants in this course will gain a basic knowledge of structural engineering that includes the principles of analysis of structures and their application, the behaviour of materials under loading, the selection of construction materials, and the design fundamentals for Reinforced Cement Concrete (RCC) and steel structures. The emphasis will be on the determination of the nature and quantum of stress developed under  loads, and the way structures offer resistance to it. Being the most widely used construction materials, RCC and steel will be covered in detail, though masonry and timber are also introduced. 

NB: The course description of all EIT "Certificate" courses has been changed to "Professional Certificate of Competency". Some course brochures are not yet updated. The actual certificate received by successful students will include the new title.


COURSE OUTLINEMODULE 1: ANALYSIS OF STATICALLY DETERMINATE STRUCTURES I

Classification of structures
Types of loads
Stress in structural members
Types of supports in structures
Equilibrium of bodies

MODULE 2: ANALYSIS O F STATICALLY DETERMINATE STRUCTURES II

Bending moment and shear force
Effect of moving loads
Analysis of pin-jointed frames

MODULE 3: PRINCIPLES OF STRENGTH OF MATERIALS I

Mechanical properties of materials
Development of internal stresses
Flexural stresses in beams
Relationship between horizontal and vertical shear

MODULE 4: PRINCIPLES O F STRENGTH OF MATERIALS II

Determination of bending shear stress
Deformation of beams
Combined stresses

MODULE 5: ANALYSIS OF STATICALLY INDETERMINATE STRUCTURES I

Structural classification based on degree of indeterminacy
Principle of superposition
Analysis of statistically indeterminate beams
Multi-span or continuous beams

MODULE 6: ANALYSIS OF STATICALLY INDETERMINATE STRUCTURES II

Slope deflection method
Moment distribution method
Influence line diagram for statically indeterminate structures

MODULE 7: DESIGN THEORIES AND LOADS

Stress-strain relationship for different materials
Design philosophies
Combination of loads
Theories of failure

MODULE 8: DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES I

Properties of structural steel
Steel structural sections
Design of steel structures
Joints and fasteners for steel structures

MODULE 9: DESIGN OF STEEL  STRUCTURES II

Design of tension members
Design of compression members
Design of beams
Design of truss and allied structures

MODULE 10: DESIGN OF RCC STRUCTURES I

Properties of concrete
Principle of reinforced concrete design
Design norms for reinforced concrete beams
Design of reinforced concrete slabs

MODULE 11: DESIGN OF RCC STRUCTURES II

Design of reinforced concrete foundations
Design of axially loaded columns
Pre-stressed concrete
Multi-storied buildings

MODULE 12: DESIGN OF MASONRY AND TIMBER STRUCTURES

Masonry structures
Design of masonry structures
Strength of timber
Design of timber structures

COURSE FEES

What are the fees for my country?

The Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT) provides distance education to students located almost anywhere in the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. A full list of fees in a currency appropriate for every country would be complex to navigate and, with today’s exchange rate fluctuations, difficult to maintain. Instead we aim to give you a rapid response regarding fees that is customised to your individual circumstances.

We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student commences study. For a rapid reply to your enquiry regarding courses fees and payment options, please enquire via the below button and we will respond within 2 business days.

 

68049| Engineering Institute of Technology| Professional Certificate of Competency in Mechanical Design Concepts for Non-Engineering Professionals|

YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO:

  • Apply basic mechanical engineering concepts such as force, work, power, moments and torque
  • Identify the various balanced and unbalanced forces and loads in a system
  • Determine the importance of common engineering material properties in relation to component life and failure
  • Perform basic design for static strength
  • Apply the theory and principles governing the operation of common mechanical drive components
  • Select appropriate gears and bearings
  • Understand the underlying principles governing the operation of common mechanical prime movers and actuators
  • Distinguish between the various heat transfer mechanisms and understand the principles governing the design of heat-exchangers
  • Perform simple design and selection of piping systems and related components
  • Monitor, control and analyse vibrations
  • Select the appropriate manufacturing system and understand the principles of design for manufacturing
  • Initiate and set up an effective but simple inspection and maintenance program (including lubrication)
  • Appreciate the need for standardisation and understand the common applicable mechanical standards and codes.

OVERVIEW

This course provides a solid overview of the principles of mechanical engineering to those who haven't worked in engineering or have only been peripherally involved.

This is a lighter less technical version of the more detailed alternative course "Professional Certificate of Competency in Mechanical Engineering".

Mechanical engineering in simple terms deals with any equipment that moves; this is what makes it perhaps the most broad and diverse of engineering disciplines. The mechanical discipline essentially derives its breadth from the need to design and manufacture everything from small, even nano, individual devices, such as measuring instruments, to large systems such asmachine tools and power plants. Easy installation and serviceability are critical to the success of a mechanical system as is operational and design flexibility.

Understanding parameters governing the selection and design of mechanical systems is essential for identifying suitable systems for a particular application. In order to place all these issues in context, a good working knowledge of mechanical principles combined with a solid understanding of key concepts such as force, energy and heat is important.

Mechanical power transmission is discussed from the point of view of gears, couplings and bearings. Proper selection and sizing of these critical mechanical components is vital to ensuring optimum performance and improved efficiency of a mechanical system.

Recently, fluid engineering has undergone significant change and therefore a detailed overview of the underlying principles of fluid power and its applications is vital. The theory behind heat transfer, the various heat transfer mechanisms and thedesign of heat-exchangers is also examined. Any study of mechanical systems would be incomplete without including a review of mechanical vibrations. This will help you in monitoring, controlling and analysing vibrations and in conducting fault diagnoses in mechanical systems.

The field of maintenance has evolved into a separate and highly specialised function. An effective maintenance regime helps identify failure symptoms and enables initiation of corrective measures, for preventing unscheduled and sometimes catastrophic failures. Lastly, a discussion on the numerous standards, codes and regulations governing mechanical systems, helps put thewhole program into perspective.


COURSE OUTLINEMODULE 1: MECHANICAL ENGINEERING BASICS

Introduction and basic concepts
Units for engineering quantities
Interpretation of mechanical drawings


MODULE 2: ENGINEERING MATERIALS

Stress - strain relationship
Properties of engineering materials: strength, hardness, ductility and toughness
Thermal processing of metals and how it affects their properties
Ferrous and non-ferrous alloys
Common failure of materials


MODULE 3: MECHANICAL DESIGN

Basic principles
Factor of safety
Static equilibrium
Threaded fasteners


MODULE 4: GEARS AND BEARINGS

Gears
Troubleshooting 
Bearings
Installation


MODULE 5: MECHANICAL DRIVES

Belt and chain drives
Mechanical couplings
Torque converters and fluid couplings
Clutches
Brakes


MODULE 6: PRIME MOVERS

What is a prime mover?
Internal combustion engines
Electric motors
Hydraulic and air motors
Gas turbines
Selection criteria


MODULE 7: FLUID ENGINEERING

Concepts
Piping, selection and sizing
Pumps and valves
Symbols and diagrams
Seals, fittings, flanges gaskets and O-rings


MODULE 8: THEORY OF HEAT TRANSFER

Laws of thermodynamics
Thermal cycles
Heat exchangers
Heat pumps
Air conditioning


MODULE 9: MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS

Amplitude, phase and frequency
Multiple degree of freedom system
Vibration measurement
Troubleshooting


MODULE 10: MANUFACTURING AND PRODUCTION SYSTEMS

Metal production 
Cast making and metal melting
Die and precision casting
Heat treatment 
Hot and cold working of metal
Basics of welding
Brazing


MODULE 11: MAINTENANCE

Breakdown, preventive and predictive maintenance
Factors influencing equipment downtime
Condition monitoring 
Non-destructive testing


MODULE 12: MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CODES AND STANDARDS

Standardisation
Overview of standards
Benefits

COURSE FEES

What are the fees for my country?

The Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT) provides distance education to students located almost anywhere in the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. A full list of fees in a currency appropriate for every country would be complex to navigate and, with today’s exchange rate fluctuations, difficult to maintain. Instead we aim to give you a rapid response regarding fees that is customised to your individual circumstances.

We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student commences study. For a rapid reply to your enquiry regarding courses fees and payment options, please enquire via the below button and we will respond within 2 business days.

68048| Engineering Institute of Technology| Professional Certificate of Competency in Onshore and Offshore Pipeline Systems|

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN:

  • Key principles and techniques in pipeline design, construction, installation, operation and maintenance
  • Pipeline specifications and standards
  • Key requirements that define pipeline routing
  • Fluid properties and processes and their importance to pipeline design and construction
  • Similarities and differences in onshore and offshore pipelines
  • Competencies in assessing pipeline failures and preventing damage
  • Safety and environmental regulations in pipeline design
  • Key performance indicators to monitor and assess pipeline performance

OVERVIEW

There are millions of kilometers of onshore and offshore pipelines spread across the world. With the expansion and addition of new staff, there is an increasing need for full appreciation of the engineering design of these pipeline systems. A long with this is a growing need for expanded training, to supply qualified personnel, and hence opportunity for pipeline technicians, technologists and engineers in onshore and offshore installations. Also, many personnel involved in pipeline operations do not receive even basic pipeline engineering training, while some are exposed only to specialized areas. This is where the requirement for a program such as this fits in, with its stated objective of equipping the participant with the core skills in pipeline engineering that will help enhance his/her career, and benefit the organization.

This course examines pipeline design, construction and routing through to pipeline economics and advanced practices in asset management. No matter whether you are a new mechanical or pipeline technician/technologist/engineer or a practicing operations and facilities engineer, you will find this course extremely beneficial. You will gain an in-depth understanding of the applicable standards and specifications related to pipeline design, operation and maintenance, as also grasp the engineering principles involving liquid and gas flow and their importance in relation to pipeline design. The use of key performance indicators will be derived to measure the performance of your valuable asset, the pipeline.

With its relevance to both onshore and offshore pipelines, the program equips you with a multidisciplinary understanding of pipelines and enables you to understand the full cycle of pipeline engineering.


COURSE OUTLINEMODULE 1: INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW

Pipeline basics and factors influencing pipeline design
Pipeline route selection
Codes and standards affecting pipeline design, construction, operation and maintenance
Pipeline design principles - hydraulics, mechanical design, materials of construction
Pipeline construction fundamentals
Pipeline protection and maintenance
Pipeline economics
Physical quantities and units used in pipeline design


MODULE 2: PIPELINE DESIGN, OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS

Codes and specifications
Codes and standards governing the design, operation and maintenance of pipeline
Common features of pipeline codes and standards
Symbols and units used in pipeline design standards
Abbreviation used in pipeline design standards
Information typically contained in piping specifications
Guidelines for pipeline operation and maintenance


MODULE 3: PIPELINE ROUTING

Introduction to pipeline routing
Factors influencing pipeline routing
Pipeline routing “rules of thumb”
Tools and data used in pipeline routing
Consideration of alternate routes


MODULE 4: LIQUID AND GAS FLOW

Liquid and gas flow fundamentals
Basic hydrodynamics
Multiphase flow
Coping with fluctuations in pipeline operating conditions
Optimization of line size, pressure drop and location of pumping stations
Hydrate formation/prevention
Wax formation/protection
Design optimization of gas pipelines


MODULE 5: GENERAL PIPELINE DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS

Forces and stresses in pipelines
Criteria for mechanical design including code criteria
Specified minimum yield strength of pipeline materials
Mechanical design equations: calculations of Maximum Allowable Pressure (MAP) and minimum required wall thickness of pipelines
Sustained loads in pipelines and stresses due to thermal expansion/contraction
Estimating the maximum span of unsupported pipe
Offshore spanning, spanning control and spanning correction
Design of pipeline riser for offshore pipelines
Pipeline shore approaches


MODULE 6: PIPELINE MATERIALS

Common pipeline materials
Metallurgy and manufacture of low-alloy carbonmanganese steel pipes
Effect of treatment of pipeline steels
Flexible and composite pipelines
High pressure and high temperature pipelines


MODULE 7: ONSHORE PIPELINE CONSTRUCTION

Sequence of construction activities
Construction equipment
Preparing of the Right of Way (ROW) for the pipeline
Stringing the pipeline
Bending
Welding and post-weld qualification
Lowering
Tie-in and assembly
Testing and inspection
Back filling of trench
Construction techniques used in water crossing
Commissioning the pipeline


MODULE 8: OFFSHORE PIPELINE CONSTRUCTION

Construction methods (lay barges, reel barges, pull and tow)
Pipeline trenching methods
Pipeline bundles
Pipe in pipe method
Flexible pipelines and umbilical
Cross country and offshore system welding


MODULE 9: PIPELINE INSTALLATION

Pipeline installation methods
Pipeline bending stress control
Pipeline on-bottom stability control
S-lay, J-lay, deep water installation
Allowable installation stresses/fatigue
Burial methods and depths


MODULE 10: PIPELINE COMMISSIONING, OPERATION, MAINTENANCE AND FAILURES

Pipeline pressure testing and pre-commissioning
Flow assurance
Pigging operations
Pipeline integrity management
Pipeline monitoring and inspection
Leak detection and emergency planning
Defect assessment
Intervention, repair and modification
Failure modes
Risks, reliability, and safety
Environmental and regulatory requirements


MODULE 11: PIPELINE PROTECTION

Possible causes and consequences of pipeline damage
Prevention of pipeline damage
Corrosion fundamentals
Characteristics and properties of pipeline coatings
Cathodic protection
Internal corrosion
Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC)
Pipeline integrity programs
Thermal coating and pipeline insulation
Weight coating for stability on seabed


MODULE 12: PIPELINE ECONOMICS AND ASSET MANAGEMENT

Introduction to pipeline economics
Terminology used in pipeline economics
Pipeline performance: Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for monitoring and assessing pipeline performance

COURSE FEES

What are the fees for my country?

The Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT) provides distance education to students located almost anywhere in the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. A full list of fees in a currency appropriate for every country would be complex to navigate and, with today’s exchange rate fluctuations, difficult to maintain. Instead we aim to give you a rapid response regarding fees that is customised to your individual circumstances.

We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student commences study. For a rapid reply to your enquiry regarding courses fees and payment options, please enquire via the below button and we will respond within 2 business days.

68047| Engineering Institute of Technology| Professional Certificate of Competency in Chemical Engineering and Plant Design|

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN:

  • Fundamentals of chemical engineering
  • Simple process calculations including mass and energy balances
  • Develop Process Flow Diagrams (PFDs)
  • Contribute to process design activities
  • Simple specifications of pumps and heat exchangers
  • Mass transfer phenomena
  • Process drawings and link them to plant operation
  • Apply safety guidelines to a process or chemical plant
  • Basic chemical engineering jargon and terminology
  • Plant layout fundamentals and procedures
  • Terminology and symbols used in plant layout
  • Equipment used in process plants
  • Piping design and engineering principles
  • Terminology, symbols and abbreviations in piping design
  • Documents (bill of materials, equipment specifications) and drawings (PFDs P&IDs) used in plant layout and piping design
  • 3D modeling

OVERVIEW

Process plants such as refineries and petrochemical plants are complex facilities consisting of equipment, piping systems, instruments, electrical systems, electronics, computers and control systems. The design, engineering and construction of process plants involves multidisciplinary team effort. Process design, plant layout and design of piping systems constitute a major part of the design and engineering effort. The objective is to design safe and dependable processing facilities in a cost effective manner. There are few formal training programs with a comprehensive coverage of all three major topics of process design, plant layout and design of piping systems. Therefore, most of the required skills are acquired while on the job, reducing productivity and efficiency.

This course provides you with the basic knowledge and skills in the disciplines of chemical engineering and plant design to facilitate faster learning curves while on the job. It covers the fundamental principles and concepts used in process design and plant design. Upon completion of this course, you will have a clear understanding of the design and engineering principles used in the design of process plants.


COURSE OUTLINEMODULE 1: INTRODUCTION TO PROCESS PLANT LAYOUT AND PIPING DESIGN

Fundamental concepts
Design tasks
Procedures and the workflow methods
Physical quantities and units used in design


MODULE 2: INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL ENGINEERING I

Unit operations
Unit processes
Process Flow Diagrams (PFDs)


MODULE 3: MASS AND ENERGY BALANCES

Physical quantities
Units and dimensions
Process stoichiometry
Mass balances
Energy balances


MODULE 4: THERMODYNAMICS

Ideal Gas Law
I and II Laws
Applications to pumps, turbines and compressors
Vapor - liquid equilibrium


MODULE 5: FLUID MECHANICS

Continuity equation
Velocity
Laminar and turbulent flows
Friction factor
Pressure drop
Pump sizing and performance curves
Pump data sheet
Flow meters
Layout and piping for pumps


MODULE 6: HEAT TRANSFER

Principles of conduction
Convection and radiation
Heat exchangers
Heat exchanger data sheet
Layout and piping for heat exchangers


MODULE 7: PRINCIPLES OF MASS TRANSFER

Distillation
Absorption
Evaporation
Layout and piping for a distillation unit


MODULE 8: CHEMICAL KINETICS AND REACTOR DESIGN

Chemical reactors
Reactor design
Layout and piping for reactors


MODULE 9: PROCESS CONTROL AND INSTRUMENTATION

The need for process control
Feedforward and feedback control loops
Basics of Advanced Process Control (APC)


MODULE 10: MATERIALS AND MATERIALS SPECIFICATIONS FOR PIPING AND EQUIPMENT

Pipes
Fittings
Flanges
Valves


MODULE 11:INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL ENGINEERING II

Plot Plans
3-D Models
Drawings and documents used in plant design


MODULE 12: PIPING SYSTEM COMPONENTS

Process safety
Process economics

COURSE FEES

What are the fees for my country?

The Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT) provides distance education to students located almost anywhere in the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. A full list of fees in a currency appropriate for every country would be complex to navigate and, with today’s exchange rate fluctuations, difficult to maintain. Instead we aim to give you a rapid response regarding fees that is customised to your individual circumstances.

We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student commences study. For a rapid reply to your enquiry regarding courses fees and payment options, please enquire via the below button and we will respond within 2 business days.

68046| Engineering Institute of Technology| Professional Certificate of Competency in Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC)|

COURSE OBJECTIVES


By the end of this course you will be able to:

  • Maintain and troubleshoot HVAC systems
  • Understand and apply the psychrometic chart
  • Design for good air quality
  • Perform basic load calculations
  • Initiate an effective inspection and maintenance program
  • Reduce forced outages and prevent serious damage to HVAC equipment
  • Provide an overview of the legislative requirements plus the essential steps and responsibilities for the maintenance and repair of HVAC systems
  • Outline the technologies available for the efficient energy management using HVAC systems


This course is also available to students resident in India. Please click here for information and fees for Indian students.

OVERVIEW

This course is designed for engineers and technicians from a wide range of abilities and backgrounds and will provide an excellent introduction to the fundamentals of heatingventilation and air-conditioning. It commences with a review ofpsychrometric charts and then examines the factors that influence design choicesindoor air qualityload calculationsand heating/ventilation and air-conditioning systems. Numerous tips and tricks taught throughout the course make it very practical and topical to your every day applications.


CONTENT OUTLINEMODULE 1: INTRODUCTION TO HVAC

Principles of thermodynamics
Pressure and temperature relationship
Fundamentals of heat transfer
Fundamentals of fluid flow


MODULE 2: PSYCHROMETRY

Introduction to psychrometry
The properties of air
Understanding the psychrometric charts


MODULE 3: REQUIREMENTS OF COMFORT AIR CONDITIONING

Air purification methods
Thermodynamics of the human body
Role of clothing
Comfort and comfort chart
Design considerations
Requirements of temperature and humidity-high heat load industries
Recommended inside design conditions
Outside summer design conditions for some foreign cities
Indoor Air Quality
Design of ventilation systems


MODULE 4: HEATING AND COOLING LOAD CALCULATION PROCEDURE

Design considerations
Internal Sensible and Latent Heat Load components
Design condition - indoor & outdoor conditions
External Load components
Miscellaneous heat sources
Fresh air load


MODULE 5: HVAC SYSTEMS

Heating systems
Hot water heating system
Steam heating systems
Electric heating systems
Air-conditioning systems: General
Air handling units
Functional variations in the design
Capacity calculation of an air handling unit


MODULE 6 - VARIABLE AIR VOLUME (VAV) SYSTEMS

System concept
Different VAV systems


MODULE 7 - DUCT DESIGN, AIR FLOW AND ITS DISTRIBUTION

Air flow and pressure losses
Duct design
Air distribution system inside space
Ventilation systems


MODULE 8 - INSULATION OF AIR-CONDITIONING SYSTEMS AND AIR-CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT

Desired properties of an ideal insulating material
Factors affecting thermal conductivity
Types of insulation materials
Insulated systems
Importance of relative humidity for the selection of insulation
Air-conditioning equipment
Air filters
Humidifiers
Dehumidifiers
Fans and blowers


MODULE 9 - REFRIGERATION

Methods of refrigeration
Air refrigeration system
Vapour compression refrigeration system
Absorption refrigeration system
Important refrigerants
Refrigeration equipment


MODULE 10 - CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTATION

Elements of control
Types of control system
Typical control systems


MODULE 11 - INSTALLATION, COMMISSIONING, OPERATION, TESTING AND MAINTENANCE

Installation
Charging the refrigeration unit
Adding oil to the compressor
Commissioning
Other service operations
Maintenance


MODULE 12 - FAULT FINDING AND TROUBLESHOOTING AND GREEN HOUSE EFFECT AND FUTURE REFRIGERANTS

Troubleshooting
The greenhouse effect
History of CFCs
Ozone depletion by CFCs and the greenhouse effect
Future refrigerants to replace CFCs

COURSE FEES

What are the fees for my country?

The Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT) provides distance education to students located almost anywhere in the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. A full list of fees in a currency appropriate for every country would be complex to navigate and, with today’s exchange rate fluctuations, difficult to maintain. Instead we aim to give you a rapid response regarding fees that is customised to your individual circumstances.

We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student commences study. For a rapid reply to your enquiry regarding courses fees and payment options, please enquire via the below button and we will respond within 2 business days.

68044| Engineering Institute of Technology| Professional Certificate of Competency in Fundamental E & I Engineering for Oil and Gas Facilities|

IN THIS INTERACTIVE 3-MONTH ONLINE COURSE YOU WILL GAIN:

  • Skills and competencies in electrical and instrumentation (E&I) oil and gas engineering
  • Knowledge of the latest technologies in E&I oil and gas engineering
  • Key techniques in operating a facility to the highest level of safety and in protecting the environment
  • Plus much more!
     


Next intake starts October 05, 2015. There are limited places available.

Contact us now to speak to a Course Advisor and secure your place!

Payment is not required until two to four weeks before the course begins.

OVERVIEW

There is a growing shortage, and hence opportunity, for Electrical and Instrumentation (E&I) technicians, technologists and engineers in the oil and gas industry. This is due to an increasing need for higher technology methods of obtaining and processing oil and gas as it is a finite declining resource. The price of oil is heading upwards steadily, thus making personnel and their associated oil and gas expertise in these industries even more valuable. The technical challenges of extracting oil and gas are becoming ever more demanding, with increasing emphasis on more marginal fields and previously inaccessible zones such as deep oceans, Polar regions, Falkland Islands and Greenland. The aim for this program is to provide you with core E&I engineering skills to enhance your career, and to benefit your firm.

This program provides a whole spectrum of activities ranging from basic E&I engineering through to advanced practice in hazardous areas and data communications. It will take an in-depth look at a vast array of E&I equipment used in an oil and gas environment as well as examples of practical treatment of electrical power systems and instrumentation within the oil, gas, petrochemical and offshore industries. Whilst there is some theory included, it is used in a practical context, giving you the necessary tools to ensure that the E&I hardware is delivering the results intended.

COURSE OUTLINEMODULE 1: FUNDAMENTALS OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Power systems
Power generation


MODULE 2: FUNDAMENTALS OF PROCESS CONTROL ENGINEERING

Instrumentation, measurement
Process measurement


MODULE 3: GENERAL INSTRUMENTATION STANDARDS IN OIL AND GAS

Engineering standards, PID, electrical schematics
Calibration and errors


MODULE 4: PROCESS INSTRUMENTATION

Flow
Pressure
Temperature


MODULE 5: PROCESS CONTROL BASICS

Loop control
Feed forward, feedback, cascading
Control valves sizing, selection and maintenance (including pressure relief valves)


MODULE 6: AUTOMATED CONTROL

Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs)
SCADA systems


MODULE 7: REMOTE CONTROL

Distributed control systems
Industrial data communications (including Fieldbus and industrial Ethernet)


MODULE 8: SAFETY INSTRUMENTATION AND EMERGENCY SHUTDOWN SYSTEMS FOR OIL AND GAS

IEC 61511 and IEC 61508
Basic introduction to SIS
LOPA, SIL


MODULE 9: OIL + GAS CONTROL SYSTEMS – WELLHEAD

Wellhead and flowline control – control systems
Emergency wellhead blowout controls


MODULE 10: OIL + GAS CONTROL SYSTEMS - PIPELINE

Compressor control (including surge control)
Drilling control systems and instrumentation


MODULE 11: OIL + GAS POWER SYSTEMS

Power generation
Cathodic protection


MODULE 12: OIL GAS PROTECTION SYSTEMS

Subsea instrumentation and control systems
Pig launcher/receiver systems
Critical flare knock out drum controls and instrumentation
Flare flame front generator and ignition monitoring system

COURSE FEES

What are the fees for my country?

The Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT) provides distance education to students located almost anywhere in the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. A full list of fees in a currency appropriate for every country would be complex to navigate and, with today’s exchange rate fluctuations, difficult to maintain. Instead we aim to give you a rapid response regarding fees that is customised to your individual circumstances.

We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student commences study. For a rapid reply to your enquiry regarding courses fees and payment options, please enquire via the below button and we will respond within 2 business days.

68043| Engineering Institute of Technology| Professional Certificate of Competency in Circuit Breakers, Switchgear and Power Transformers – Safe operation and Maintenance|

YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO:

  • Describe the fundamentals of operating switchgear and circuit breakers
  • Select appropriate type and rating of circuit breakers and switchgear
  • Understand the operation of switchgear components (CTs, VTs, relays and cable terminations)
  • Describe the principles of operation of power transformers
  • Identify and apply the different transformer types
  • Set up simple transformer protection schemes
  • Detail power transformer testing procedures
  • Manage power transformer breakdowns to minimise disruption
  • Detail safe working procedures in switch rooms, indoor and outdoor substations
  • Draw up simple operational policies for safety rules
  • Detail practical maintenance strategies for switchgear and transformers


Next intake is August 24, 2015. There are limited places available.

Contact us now to obtain further course details and fees and to secure your place.

Payment is only required between two (2) and four (4) weeks before the start of the course.

OVERVIEW

Switchgear (and circuit breakers) and transformers are critical components in electrical distribution systems and their operation significantly affects the overall performance of the system. This course will discuss the application, installation, maintenance and testing issues relating to medium and high voltage switchgear, circuit breakers and transformers. Low voltage switchgear will also be covered and you will receive a thorough grounding in switchgear theory and standards. You will gain a solid understanding of the issues associated with the proper application, installation and maintenance of these critical items of equipment with an overriding emphasis on safety. The emphasis is on medium voltage (referred today as high voltage) switchgear which represents most of the switchgear installed on electrical distribution systems. The focus is on air blast, oil, SF6 and vacuum circuit breakers.

Case studies covering the main manufacturers' equipment will illustrate the important practical principles. Other power system protection components will be discussed as well to ensure that switchgear is understood in the correct context. Installation of high voltage distribution and transmission equipment has increased significantly over the years due to ongoing global demand for power. As a result, the need to ensure reliability of operation of power systems is paramount. Power transformers are among the most important and most expensive components of power systems. Their failure can impose extraordinarily high costs on plants, factories and utilities of all descriptions. It is critical that all personnel operating and working with such equipment have a sound knowledge of their operational requirements and maintenance.

This practical course provides knowledge on both the theory and operation of Power Transformers. The course will develop and enhance an understanding of what is involved in the maintenance of these essential components of the power systems, through the tips and tricks learnt and developed by some of the world's pre-eminent electrical engineers.


COURSE OUTLINEMODULE 1: INTRODUCTION TO SWITCHGEAR AND TRANSFORMERS

Single line diagrams
Active and passive network components
Circuit breaker utilisation
Alternative forms of MV switchgear – ring main units and load breaking/fault making switches
Fuse switches
HV fuses in combination with, and as alternatives to circuit breakers
Auto-reclosers and auto-reclose operation


MODULE 2: APPLICATION OF SWITCHGEAR

Principles of current interruption
Plain break circuit breakers
Bulk and small oil volume circuit breakers
Turbulator (explosion pot)
Operating mechanisms
Transfer earth circuit breakers
Air break and air blast switchgear
SF6 and vacuum
Switchgear in association with isconnectors
Fixed and withdraw-able designs
Switchgear standards
Factors affecting switchgear selection


MODULE 3: SPECIFICATION OF SWITCHGEAR

Switchgear ratings - highest system and impulse withstand voltages, load and short circuit currents
Simple and complex protection systems
Switchgear ancillaries, measurement CTs, VTs and relays
Cable terminations
Indoor and outdoor operation
Substation and switch room layouts and design

SHORT CIRCUIT TESTING

Symmetrical and asymmetrical breaking
Make and break operations
Understanding test oscillograms
Case study - Specification for a 132 KV Switchboard


MODULE 4: SAFETY POLICIES

General safety precautions and the use of personal protective equipment
Principles of safety rules
Principles of personal authorization
Operative training for safe operation of switchgear
Isolation in a circuit breaker context
Safety documentation
Operational and safety locking, caution and danger notices
Work safety in a substation environment
Safety interlocks
Substation alarms
Individual study tasks and presentation - safety policies in my company and how they might be improved


MODULE 5: OPERATION OF MODERN SWITCHGEAR

Case Studies
- Sprecher and Schuh
- Schneider
- ABB
- Siemens

ASSETS MANAGEMENT IN A SWITCHGEAR CONTEXT

Principles of time and condition based asset management
Asset registers
Asset management systems


MODULE 6: DIAGNOSTICS, TESTING AND MAINTENANCE

Switchgear inspection methodologies
Partial discharge measurement and survey
Timing tests
Thermovision
Mechanisms of deterioration
Principles of circuit breaker maintenance
Maintaining oil circuit breakers
Contact maintenance and contact wipe
Oil testing
Maintaining vacuum circuit breakers
Maintaining SF6 circuit breakers
SOPs and DINs
Switchgear defects and defect control Systems


MODULE 7: TRANSFORMERS' MAIN FUNCTIONS AND CLASSIFICATION

Construction (shell type and core type)
Classification and type in relation to insulation, windings, core, cooling systems, voltage level, sizing, tank and breathing action
Transformer parts

POWER TRANSFORMERS AND SAFETY

How to install, operate and work with high voltage power transformers safely
Earthing of HV transformers


MODULE 8: TRANSFORMER THEORY

Electrical values and their definition in a power transformer - voltage, current, number of turns, impedance and their interrelation

OPERATION OF POWER TRANSFORMERS IN A POWER SYSTEM

Thermal performance, loading, paralleling, tap-changing, connections and vector groups


MODULE 9: POWER TRANSFORMER PROTECTION

Surge protection
Protective relaying (differential, over-current and earth fault)
Buchholz relay and pressure relief relay
Thermal devices and instruments (oil temperature alarm and trip, winding temperature alarm and trip)


MODULE 10: AUTO-TRANSFORMERS, GENERATOR TRANSFORMERS, UNIT TRANSFORMERS AND STATION TRANSFORMERS

Design criteria
Specifications


MODULE 11: OIL QUALITY

Oil contents: water, acidity and dissolved gas
Oil tests: dielectric breakdown, moisture, resistivity, interfacial tension, specific gravity, power factor and furan analysis
Recovery voltage measurement test


MODULE 12: POWER TRANSFORMER ELECTRICAL TESTS

AC Tests:

- Power factor tests (insulation, oil, and bushings)
- Single phase excitation current test
- Transformer turns ratio test

DC Tests:

- Insulation resistance test
- Dielectric absorption test
- Polarization index test
- Step voltage test
- Hi-pot test

PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE ON POWER TRANSFORMERS

Techniques to improve life expectancy

COURSE FEES

What are the fees for my country?

The Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT) provides distance education to students located all around the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. We aim to give you a rapid response regarding course fees that are relevant to your individual circumstances.

We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student begins to study. For a rapid reply to your query regarding courses fees and payment options, please contact a Course Advisor in your region via the below button and we will respond within two (2) business days.

68042| Engineering Institute of Technology| Professional Certificate of Competency in Substation Design (Control, Protection and Facility Planning)|

YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO:

  • Perform the design of substation earthing so as to ensure safety of personnel and equipment under all conditions
  • Design appropriate protection against the direct and indirect effects of lightning strikes on substations and the incoming/outgoing overhead lines
  • Select and apply appropriate power system protection to protect equipment and personnel from abnormal system conditions including short circuits and earth faults
  • Determine the auxiliary power requirements and perform sizing calculations for the battery backup of essential dc power supply
  • Understand the requirements for site preparation, foundations, structures, cable trenches and draining arrangements to effectively coordinate with design teams of related disciplines
  • Select and apply gas insulated switchgear if outdoor type HV substations cannot be used due to any site-related constraints and adjust the other design elements to suit this option


Next intake starts August 10, 2015
. There are limited places available.

Contact us now to speak to a Course Advisor and secure your place!

Payment is not required until two to four weeks before the course begins.

OVERVIEW

Substations are the key assets in any power system and serve as important nodes in a transmission and distribution network. Substations thus handle multiple voltages in a given location and link two or more systems of different voltages. In the first part of this two part certificate series, the participants were given a thorough understanding of the basic principles of substation design, configuration of a substation, the specification/selection of equipment based on a selected configuration, conducting system studies to verify/correct the initial assumptions and to plan the layout of the substation. 

In this part, the focus will be on the other subsystems that perform essential functions in substations. These include earthing, lightning protection of outdoor equipment and substation buildings, power system protection, control and interlocking equipment including the auxiliary power sources and various switchyard facilities such as foundation, structures, cable routing, lighting, fire protection and surveillance equipment.

Earthing of a HV switchyard requires careful design as it has a direct bearing on safety. The design approach to switchyards will be discussed and the basic methods of calculation will be outlined. Lightning is a common occurrence which poses a threat to substation equipment and supply reliability by causing overvoltage surges resulting in insulation failure or spark over. While lightning cannot be prevented, its effects can be minimised by proper lightning and surge protection measures.

Any electrical equipment is susceptible to insulation failures. Protection against such failures and the resulting short circuits is a vital need in power systems. The various protection options available to the designer and the protection of busbars, transformers and substation feeders will be discussed in two parts. Another essential system is the control of switchyard equipment and the auxiliary power supply required for control. Ac auxiliary power is generally used for operation of isolators/disconnectors, the operating mechanism of circuit breakers and for substation lighting. Essential functions are powered through dc supply backed with batteries for reliability. This includes control, annunciation and protection functions, breaker close and trip commands and in some cases emergency lightning.

A switchyard has to be properly planned by preparing the site, measuring earth resistivity required for earthing design/optimisation, earth work, foundations, cable trenches inside the switchyard, draining arrangements etc. These aspects will be covered in detail in a separate module. The last module will discuss about gas insulated switchgear as an alternative to outdoor open type switchyards. 

All the above topics will be dealt in this course using a simple step-by-step approach through real life examples. At each step, the basic design approach and calculations will be performed by the students to clearly understand the concepts that are being taught.

There will be 12 modules covered in over 3 months to give the students adequate time to try and apply the concepts learnt in the modules in the context of their workplace and discuss them with the course facilitator. The contents and sequence of the modules can be seen in the course outline.


COURSE OUTLINEMODULE 1: EARTHING SYSTEM OF SWITCHYARDS

Basics of functional and protective earthing
Touch and step voltages in substations
Design of earth grid-basic considerations in conductor sizing and mesh spacing
Safety mesh at operating points
Role of gravel layer in safety
Transferred voltage hazards and planning isolation of outgoing services to avoid transfer voltage


MODULE 2: EXAMPLE OF SWITCHYARD EARTHING SYSTEM DESIGN

Based on the layout and data of a given HV switchyard:
Perform earthing calculations including sizing of earthing conductors
Calculate the earth mesh size for the switchyard
Develop a layout for the mesh and show the other connections required to avoid transferred voltages
Show the size of safety mesh to be provided and the operating points on the layout
Draw up the installation specification for the earthing system


MODULE 3: LIGHTNING PROTECTION OF SWITCHYARDS

Basics of lightning and hazards
Role of shield wire and lightning masts
Typical configurations of lightning protection of switchyards
Analysis of hazard using cone of protection and rolling sphere methods
Selection of lightning arrestors-Types, class and ratings


MODULE 4: EXAMPLE OF SWITCHYARD LIGHTNING AND SURGE PROTECTION DESIGN

Design the lightning protection of a typical HV switchyard based on a given layout and analyse the adequacy of protection
Locate and select surge protection (lightning arrestors) of the above HV switchyard


MODULE 5: PROTECTION DESIGN FOR SUBSTATION-1

Brief overview of protection
Over current protection
Current transformers requirements for protection
Protection relays
IEDs and communication options
Protection coordination


MODULE 6: EXAMPLES/CASE STUDIES OF MV SUBSTATION PROTECTION

Based on the data/SLD for a typical MV substation work out:
Suggested protective devices for over current and earth fault
Suggested settings
Select the specifications of CT and VT
Checking of CT burden
Protection coordination checking
Explore substation automation system using IEDs provided for protection
Prepare an ordering specification


MODULE 7: PROTECTION DESIGN FOR SUBSTATION-2

Protection of transformers
Busbar protection
Feeder protection
Equipment requirements for substation automation
PLCC applications in protection and communication
PLCC hardware and integrating them with the switchyard equipment


MODULE 8: EXAMPLES/CASE STUDIES OF HV SUBSTATION PROTECTION

Using the data/SLD of a typical HV outdoor switchyard, work out the following:
Suggested protection schemes for all the feeders of the switchyard, its busbars and transformers
Explore use of PLCC for line protection and communication
Prepare an ordering specification for protection equipment


MODULE 9: SWITCHYARD CONTROL AND INTERLOCKING

DC power requirements for switchyard equipment
DC equipment configuration and specifications
DC distribution for switchyard equipment
Battery calculations basis
Space planning and related facilities for a battery installation
AC auxiliary power for switchyard systems-loads which require AC power
Possible source options
AC auxiliary distribution for switchyard equipment and support systems
Control scheme of disconnectors and circuit breakers
Control interconnection approach
Use of optical fibre-based control scheme
Role and location of marshalling kiosks in different bays


MODULE 10: EXAMPLE CASE  STUDY OF DESIGN OF HV SUBSTATION CONTROL AND AUXILIARY SYSTEMS

Based on the data of typical substation with both HV and MV switchgear, work out the following:
DC auxiliary requirements
Battery sizing calculation
DC auxiliary equipment and their ratings
DC distribution SLD
Layout of dc equipment
AC auxiliary power requirement
Sources and rating
AC auxiliary system SLD
Layout of auxiliary switchgear
Interconnections of AC and DC auxiliary power and switchyard controls


MODULE 11: SWITCHYARD-FACILITY PLANNING

Site preparation, levelling
Earth resistivity measurement and its role in design verification
Civil works such as equipment foundations, cable trenches, control building, storm drains, transformer oil collection pit
Structures and their design requirements
Substation fence and physical security
Surveillance
Planning water requirements and supply arrangement
Fire protection, lighting and ventilation of control room and other equipment


MODULE 12: GAS INSULATED SWITCHGEAR (GIS) AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO OUTDOOR SWITCHYARD

HV gas insulated substation-an alternative to outdoor HV switchyards
SF6 properties, advantages and environmental impact
Typical substation configurations in SF6
Indoor/outdoor options
Gas safety considerations
Equipment for handling SF6
SF6 substation layout planning and earthing considerations
Cable terminations to SF6 equipment

COURSE FEES

What are the fees for my country?

The Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT) provides distance education to students located almost anywhere in the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. A full list of fees in a currency appropriate for every country would be complex to navigate and, with today’s exchange rate fluctuations, difficult to maintain. Instead we aim to give you a rapid response regarding fees that is customised to your individual circumstances.

We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student commences study. For a rapid reply to your enquiry regarding courses fees and payment options, please enquire via the below button and we will respond within 2 business days.

68041| Engineering Institute of Technology| Professional Certificate of Competency in Operation and Maintenance of Diesel Power Generating Plants|

By the end of this 3-month interactive online course you will be able to: 

  • Understand the principles of combustion processes and engine operation
  • Differentiate between the types and applications of diesel power generating plants
  • Understand fuel and lube oil requirements
  • Comprehend ISO ratings and terminologies
  • Explain the various engine components and their functions
  • Understand the generator principles and construction
  • Review plant layout requirements for single and multiple units
  • Learn about associated control panels and operation
  • Comprehend the testing and commissioning procedures
  • Understand plant performance troubleshooting techniques
  • Learn and apply good maintenance practices


Next intake starts August 03, 2015
. There are limited places available.

Contact us now to speak to a Course Advisor and secure your place!

Payment is not required until two to four weeks before the course begins.

OVERVIEW

Diesel generating plants have an important role in power plants as well as in industries and commercial installations to meet continuous and emergency standby power requirements. A good knowledge of basic operation principles, layout requirements, associated components and maintenance practices for diesel power plants help the career development of many engineers and technicians in today’s world. Whatever your role in industry - designer, purchase engineer, installation contractor or maintenance engineer - a solid knowledge of diesel power plants is always useful. This interactive online course is designed to allow you to become familiar with various aspects of diesel generating power plants for practical application in three (3) months.

Examples will be taken from various industrial standard practices regarding the construction, layouts, application and maintenance procedures followed for reliable and trouble free operation of diesel power plants. The various tests to be conducted during commissioning and maintenance checks to ensure proper and long term operation of diesel power plants will also be covered in the course.

Some of the essential systems such as fuel oil layouts, lube oil requirements and control circuitry will also be covered.


COURSE OUTLINE

MODULE 1: INTRODUCTION

  • Power generation methods 
  • AC power vs DC power
  • Single phase and three phase AC power
  • Prime movers
  • Power plant types
  • Diesel power plants 
  • Advantages of diesel power generation
  • Engine types

 

MODULE 2: DIESEL TECHNOLOGY AND CLASSIFICATIONS

  • Basic engine processes
  • Reciprocating engines
  • Spark ignition engines
  • Diesel engines
  • Dual fuel engines
  • Speed classifications
  • Service classifications

 

MODULE 3: BASIC ENGINE DESIGN AND RATINGS

  • Design characteristics and formulas
  • Turbo charger 
  • Ambient conditions 
  • ISO ratings
  • Performance and efficiency
  • Efficiency enhancements
  • Engine speed
  • Fuel combustion methods

 

MODULE 4: FUEL OIL SYSTEMS AND LAYOUTS

  • Crude oil 
  • HSD, LDO and heavy fuels
  • Economics of fuel selection
  • Pressure and temperature characteristics
  • Viscosity characteristics
  • Specific heat and temperature
  • Viscosity conversion
  • Specific fuel consumption
  • Fuel filters and heaters
  • Fuel nozzles and igniters
  • Emission control
  • Storage requirements
  • Typical fuel system layouts and components

 

MODULE 5: LUBE OIL SYSTEMS

  • Lube oil specification
  • Lube oil consumption in diesel engines
  • Typical lube oil system layouts
  • Viscosity and temperature
  • Lube oil filters and heaters

 

MODULE 6: GENERATORS

  • Principle of operation 
  • Major components (field coils, commutator, DC output, regulator, armature, rotating diodes) 
  • Generator types 
  • Construction features
  • Insulation
  • Low voltage and medium voltage generators
  • Typical circuitry 
  • Design calculations 
  • Load types and generator sizing  
  • System grounding methods
  • Faults and protection 
  • Performance evaluation and testing

 

MODULE 7: DIESEL GENERATING SETS

  • Coupling requirements
  • Skid mounting
  • Layout requirements
  • Paralleling of multiple DG sets
  • Standard control panels
  • Synchronisation panels
  • Interconnections

 

MODULE 8: OTHER COMPONENTS

  • Starting methods
  • Starting characteristics
  • Battery sizing
  • Step load requirements
  • Standby requirements
  • Auto start and auto transfer schemes
  • Auto transfer switches

 

MODULE 9: DG PLANT LAYOUTS

  • Industrial applications
  • Power generation plant applications
  • Single and multiple sets
  • Fuel storage requirements
  • Air intake system
  • Exhaust system
  • Auxiliary power requirements
  • Typical power schemes

 

MODULE 10: TESTING AND COMMISSIONING

  • Factory tests
  • Pre-commissioning checks
  • Pre-commissioning tests
  • Performance monitoring
  • Fuel and lube oil consumption checks
  • Electrical system tests

 

MODULE 11: OPERATION & MAINTENANCE

  • Safety requirements
  • Operation monitoring based on applications
  • Philosophy of maintenance
  • Maintenance techniques
  • Maintenance planning and scheduling 
  • Spares and inventory management 
  • Maintenance tools   
  • Inspection
  • Engine overhaul and repair
  • Training
  • Health monitoring  
  • Troubleshooting  

MODULE 12: HYBRID DIESEL SYSTEMS

  • Introduction to hybrid diesel power plant
  • Hybrid Diesel Solar-PV Generator 
  • Hybrid Diesel and Wind Generator Plant 
  • Importance of Diesel Generators in Hybrid Systems
  • Energy storage systems
  • Biodiesel from plant oils
  • Biodiesel from animal fat
  • Digester Biogas (Digas)
  • Producer/Wood Biogas

COURSE FEES

What are the fees for my country?

The Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT) provides distance education to students located all around the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. We aim to give you a rapid response regarding course fees that are relevant to your individual circumstances.

We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student begins to study. For a rapid reply to your query regarding courses fees and payment options, please contact a Course Advisor in your region via the below button and we will respond within two (2) business days.

68040| Engineering Institute of Technology| Professional Certificate of Competency in Power Distribution|

COURSE OBJECTIVESBy the end of this course you will be able to:

  • Correctly implement the right type of switchgear for the appropriate application
  • Economically select and install the best-suited power cable for a specific application
  • Evaluate the need for power factor correction and successfully implement correction strategies
  • Implement successful maintenance strategies and procedures
  • Effectively use software techniques to solve problem areas in your power network
     

Next intake starts June 15, 2015. There are limited places available.

Contact us now to speak to a Course Advisor and secure your place!

Payment is not required until two to four weeks before the course begins.

OVERVIEW

A practical program in power distribution, focusing on medium voltage (1kV- 36kV) power considerations, switchgear, power cables, transformers, power factor correction, earthing, lightning protection and network studies.

You will gain technical know-how in these areas not covered by university or college programs. At the end of this program participants will be able to:

  • Understand practical power distribution fundamentals
  • Determine short-circuit ratings quickly and effectively
  • Assess the influence of fault levers on switchgear ratings
  • Select the correct type of switchgear for the right application
  • Evaluate the advantages of modern state-of-the-art switchgear protection for your applications, including preventative maintenance information
  • Understand practical power distribution fundamentals
  • Recognise the different applications for various cable insulation types
  • Know when and how to use single core cables vs three core cables
  • Specify correct power cable installation methods
  • Correctly utilise and protect power transformers
  • Understand practical power distribution fundamentals
  • Assess and specify correct grounding throughout your electrical network
  • Determine the need for Power Factor Correction (PFC) for your environment
  • Assess the economic justification for installing PFC equipment
  • Correctly specify PFC equipment and be aware of practical consequences
  • Confidently use computer simulation software to solve and predict power network problems


COURSE OUTLINEMODULE 1: INTRODUCTION

History and growth of power distribution
Benefits of 3-phase AC power system
Typical characteristics of an industrial distribution system
Voltage classification
Multiple voltage levels in power distribution
Types of distribution arrangements and redundancy
Expandability


MODULE 2: DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM PLANNING

The need for system planning
Approach to system planning
Data collection
Protection of future growth of electricity demand
Location of key assets
Selection of basic system parameters
Planning of electrical system configuration
Equipment ratings/sizing
Selection of appropriate equipment
System studies needed for planning
Software packages used for system studies


MODULE 3: IN-PLANT GENERATION AND ITS INTEGRATION WITH PLANT POWER SYSTEMS

Why in-plant generation?
Cost of power interruptions in critical processes
Types of in-plant generation
Parallel operation of in-plant generator with external source
In-plant power generation sources
Integrating in-plant generation with plant distribution


MODULE 4: TRANSFORMERS

Transformer theory
Construction
Cooling
Voltage control
Power transformers and distribution transformers
Installation of transformers
Fire protection measures for large transformer installations
Troubleshooting


MODULE 5: SWITCHGEAR

Indoor and outdoor construction
Comparison
Metal enclosed switchgear basics
Major components
Safety features
Protection
Switchgear ratings
Typical switchgear example


MODULE 6: CIRCUIT BREAKERS

Types of circuit breakers
Comparison of various breakers
Construction of typical circuit breaker
Fault detection of cable installations
Major components and auxiliary systems


MODULE 7: LOW VOLTAGE DISTRIBUTION

LV switchgear types
LV circuit breakers
Releases for LV circuit breakers


MODULE 8: CABLES

Types and construction of cables
Basic design, selection and sizing
Insulating materials for LV and HV cables
Accessories for cable installation
Fault detection of underground cable installations
High voltage power transmission using cables


MODULE 9: FUNDAMENTALS OF PROTECTION

Need for protective apparatus
Basic requirements
Components of protection systems
Protection in distribution systems
Protective relays for circuit breaker application
Role of fuses in LV and MV distribution
Protection integrated in LV devices
Importance of settings and co-ordination of protective relays
Time and current grading


MODULE 10: EARTHING AND SAFETY

Electrical shock - why does it happen?
Touch and step potential (voltage)
Direct and indirect contact
Role of electrical insulation in safety
Avoiding electric shock-different approaches
Earthing of power supply and its safety implications
Role of earthing of equipment enclosures in human safety
Earthing in outdoor installations
Lightning safety
Lightning protection of structures


MODULE 11: POWER QUALITY

What is power quality?
Need for improving power quality
Variations in voltage amplitude and reasons
Equipment sensitivity
Handling voltage abnormalities
Tackling voltage fluctuations and flicker
Effect of power interruptions and needs of equipment
Redundancy and automation
Power factor and power factor improvement by capacitor banks


MODULE 12: ASSET MANAGEMENT AND POWER SYSTEM AUTOMATION

Asset records
Condition Based Maintenance (CBM)
Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM)
Insulation deterioration
Diagnostic techniques
Problems that may be found during switchgear maintenance
Defect management
Growth of automation in power industry
What is SCADA ?
Requirements for the SCADA master station
Requirements for SCADA remote units
Issues relating to SCADA deployment
Power system automation and its functions
Power system automation architecture
Communications with Network Control Center

COURSE FEES

What are the fees for my country?

The Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT) provides distance education to students located almost anywhere in the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. A full list of fees in a currency appropriate for every country would be complex to navigate and, with today’s exchange rate fluctuations, difficult to maintain. Instead we aim to give you a rapid response regarding fees that is customised to your individual circumstances.

We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student commences study. For a rapid reply to your enquiry regarding courses fees and payment options, please enquire via the below button and we will respond within 2 business days.

68038| Engineering Institute of Technology| Professional Certificate of Competency in the Selection, Commissioning and Maintenance of Shutdown, Blowdown, Severe Service and Choke Valves|

IN THIS 3-MONTH INTERACTIVE LIVE ONLINE COURSE YOU WILL:

  • Gain an understanding of SDV and BDV criticality in the context of a safety system, valve inherent reliability, availability requirements and operational constraints
  • Differentiate between types of SDV, BDV and severe service / choke valve designs
  • Understand valve design codes including ISO 1431, API 6D, ISO 17292
  • Learn about material selection for SDV, BDV and severe service / choke valves body and trim including NACE requirements
  • Study seat leakage classifications and standards (ANSI, IEC, ISO, BS)
  • Limit and control fugitive emissions and gland packing
  • Learn about the fire safety code, requirements and fire safe design
  • Understand the torque required, break, run and shear
  • Learn about specification of SDV, BDV and severe service / choke valves, including preparing a typical Datasheet for an actuated ball valve
  • Identify severe service applications and have an appreciation for the methods of tackling the problems associated with such applications
  • Differentiate the types of valve actuators; pneumatic spring return, hydraulic spring return, electric spring return
  • Understand size actuators and torque requirements
  • Learn about SDV/BDV accessory selection including position switches, external indication and solenoids
  • Know the use of smart positioners
  • Understand the need for closed loop hookups and the selection of instrument tubing
  • Learn about valve failure to operate on demand
  • Learn how to order valves, the supplier document schedule and the documentation list required

The only 2015 intake starts September 28.

There are limited places available to ensure a superior learning experience for our students.

Contact us now to find out more and secure your place!

OVERVIEW

Emergency Shutdown Systems (ESD) are a fundamental part of the safety systems associated with oil and gas, utility and other hazardous processes. Associated with these systems are specific valves which are used to isolate and blowdown the processes. These are referred to as Shutdown (SDV) and Blowdown (BDV) Valves respectively. Under emergency situations it is critical that these valves operate correctly. Thus the engineering of the valves and their associated actuators is paramount in ensuring plant safety. They must meet the Fire Safe and Reliability criteria determined by IEC16508 andIEC16511. This Professional Certificate of Competency (PCC) covers the requirements in detail.


In addition, the course addresses Severe Service Valves and Wellhead Choke Valves. Severe Service Valves are required where the process can cause damage to conventional valves through erosion, high noise, cavitation, high vibration, possible mechanical damage to the valve trim, other components and the process equipment around the valve. These valves are generally specialist designs that overcome these issues by "smart" design.


COURSE OUTLINEMODULE 1: INTRODUCTION

Basic concepts of SDV/BDV valves and their use as part of an Emergency Shutdown System
The requirements of safety standards applicable to SDV/BDV valves – IEC16508 / IEC16511
SIL levels, failure rates, MTBF, hardware fault tolerance, avoiding systematic failures, failure to operate on demand, redundancy
Reliability requirements of SDV/BDV valves
Valve cycle times
Applicable codes and regulations 
Definitions and terminology


MODULE 2: TYPES OF SDV/BDV VALVES

Full bore ball valve
Reduced bore valve – Sizing considerations apply 
Butterfly valve
Control valves (special considerations apply)
Linear versus rotary
Valve sizing considerations – liquid and gas
Maximum noise calculations
Material selection – Body, trim, seals, O-Rings, gaskets, 
Valve end connection options – Flanged/Clamplock
Valve trim
Leak rates – Maximum allowable seat leakage, maximum allowable backseat leakage
Fire safe valves, standards, codes and tests


MODULE 3: ACTUATORS

Types of actuators – Pneumatic /Hydraulic/Electric/Spring Return/Dual Action/ Scotch Yoke
Selection – Prolonged position (long stand still) break torque requirement
Sizing
Actuator trim
Torque requirements for blowdown valves – Spring start to open torque, opening torque, running torque, start to close (air start torque), reseat torque (end of close stroke)
Torque requirements for shutdown valves – Spring start to close torque, closing torque, running torque, start to open (air start torque), reseat torque (end of open stroke)
Stem shear torque
Minimising size on offshore applications – Dual acting hydraulic
Maximum operating pressure and maximum allowable working pressure
Actuator dimension limitations
Pneumatic hookups – Closed loop breathing systems
Hydraulic systems for remote operation of SDV/BDV valves
Fire safe actuators and fire blankets
Accumulators


MODULE 4: SPECIFICATION, SELECTION, PROCUREMENT AND FACTORY WITNESS TESTING (FWT) OF SDV/BDV VALVES

Preparation of a detailed technical specification
Datasheets for SDV/BDV
Accessories for SDV / BDV – Solenoid valves, redundant solenoid valves, exhaust valves, smart positioners, position switches and indicators
Important details for purchase orders – Handling and transportation, spare requirements, quality assurance requirements, certification of materials, supplier documentation requirements, instructions to suppliers, weight control (offshore)
Protective coating specification 
“As Built” updates to documentation
Testing – Performance testing, leak test, verification of fire safe testing, inspector competency


MODULE 5: COMMISSIONING, MAINTENANCE AND OPERATIONAL PERFORMANCE TESTING OF SDV/BDV VALVES

Commissioning of SDV/BDV valves – Important considerations during pressure testing and flushing, construction waste and sea water issues. 
Failure to operate on demand - Jerky operation, slow operation, failure to fully open or close, valve leakage
Operational performance testing of SDV/BDV valves - Proof testing periods, reliability centred maintenance techniques, partial stroke testing
The use of “Smart Positioners” to verify valve status
Maintenance of SDV/BDV Valves – Preparation of a standard for factory overhaul of SDV/BDV valves to return valve and actuator to “as new” specification


MODULE 6: RISER EMERGENCY SHUTDOWN VALVES (RESDV)

Specific requirements and description of  Riser Emergency Shutdown Valves (RESDV), the associated systems and parts – These valves are high criticality devices – Specific consideration of RESDV location
Ensuring the valve design assures the ability of valve to close on demand independently of the length of time the valve has been in service
Regulatory requirements
Reopening criteria – “Locked closed” until authorised via independent master control panel
Achieving maximum reliability
Ensuring review of common mode failure points – failure modes effects and criticality analysis
RESDV valve selection - Engineering to ensure maximum reliability, availability and durability
Actuator requirements – Spring return, closing thrust requirement
Valve closure rate
Protection for Fire, explosion and impact, active and passive fire protection, RESDV fire safe time period, fire protection failure criteria specific engineering requirements
Ensuring fail safe operation – Protection of control lines, redundancy of control lines
Factory witness testing – Full pressure and leakage test, competency of inspecting test verification engineer
Specific considerations for large valves requiring double acting hydraulic actuators
Testing objectives - Partial and full closure tests, leakage test, failure to operate on demand or within required specification actions
Inspection and testing of RESDV in operation; partial stroke testing considerations, test record, proof testing time periods, inspection procedures
Maintenance considerations
Commissioning considerations


MODULE 7: HIGH INTEGRITY PROTECTION SYSTEMS (HIPPS)

Specific requirements and description of HIPPS
Standards and regulations pertaining to HIPPS, IEC16508/IEC16511
The advantages of using HIPPS – Lower pressure rating of headers, flare system and piping
The disadvantages of HIPPS
HIPPS device integrity and architecture
Mechanical and electric HIPPS
Redundancy of devices
Safety Integrity Levels (SIL) of HIPPS – Determining the required SIL level, verification of SIL with Markov models, fault tree analysis and other methods
HIPPS justification
Design of HIPPS in accordance with IEC16511 and justification associated with API521
HIPPS hazard analysis - “What-if”  analysis; “What-if”/checklist analysis; Hazard and Operability study (HAZOP); Failure Modes, Effects, and Criticality Analysis (FMECA); Fault Tree Analysis (FTA), or Event Tree Analysis (ETA)
Preparation of a HIPPS specification and datasheet
Subsea HIPPS – API RP 17O recommended practice for subsea High Integrity Pressure Protection System (HIPPS)
Common cause failures study
The need for a safety requirement specification
Maintenance diagnostics and smart positioners
Maintenance of HIPPS
Testing frequencies
Ongoing change management of documentation, design, operation, maintenance, and testing to ensure compliance with regulations and standards
Competency of Personnel working on HIPPS


MODULE 8: SEVERE SERVICE CONTROL VALVES

Understanding and recognising the need for a severe service control valve
Identifying root causes for problems and selecting the correct technology to rectify
Severe service control valve applications
Severe service valve designs
Sizing severe service valves
Specifying control valves for severe service applications
Preparation of a severe service control valve specification and datasheet
Commissioning and maintaining severe service control valves
Specific hookups for severe service control valve applications
Accessories for severe service control valve


MODULE 9: WELLHEAD CHOKE VALVES

Oil and gas surface and subsurface wellhead choke valves
Actuators – Stepping and linear
Preparation of a typical choke valve design specification and datasheet – Process data / Production profile / Service conditions / Wellstream conditions / Mechanical requirements
Design requirements – Standards, valve body, trim, actuator, positioner, accessories
Test and certification requirements
Calculations and sizing
Noise calculations and standards
Smart positioner option
Choke valve orientation and sizes
Provision for marine conditions
Choke valve maintenance and inspection – Criticality of regular inspection, FMECA
Use of predictive instrumentation to assess erosion / corrosion, sand and erosion monitoring
Proof testing and maintenance scheduling
Common choke valve problems and solutions – Corrosion, erosion, cavitation, leaking
Subsea choke valves

NB: The course description of all EIT "Certificate" courses has been changed to "Professional Certificate of Competency". Some course brochures are not yet updated. The actual certificate received by successful students will include the new title.

COURSE FEES

What are the fees for my country?

The Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT) provides distance education to students located all around the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. We aim to give you a rapid response regarding course fees that are relevant to your individual circumstances.

We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student begins to study. For a rapid reply to your query regarding courses fees and payment options, please contact a Course Advisor in your region via the below button and we will respond within two (2) business days.

68037| Engineering Institute of Technology| Professional Certificate of Competency in Instrumentation, Automation and Process Control|

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN:

  • Instrumentation terms, concepts, diagrams and symbols
  • Implement an instrument and wiring number system
  • Overview of the use of PLCs in industrial applications
  • Pressure sources and the basic terms of pressure measurement
  • Level measurement and the basics associated with it
  • Temperature measurement and the various associated transducers
  • Flow measurement techniques
  • Control valve principles and common valve types
  • New technologies such as smart instrumentation and fieldbus
  • Integrate a complete system (considering instrumentation and total errors) as well as selection criteria, commissioning and testing
  • Overview of HMI, SCADA and DCS systems
  • Different tuning rules
  • Latest ISO requirements for a company
  • Overview of HAZOP studies
  • Understand reliability centred maintenance and spare parts analysis
  • Gain appreciation for factory and site acceptance testing
  • Considerations for building in-house panels and installations


Registrations for the September 7, 2015 intake are now open – contact us now

OVERVIEW

This course is for engineers and technicians who need to have a practical knowledge of selection, installation and commissioning of industrial instrumentation and control valves. In many respects a clear understanding and application of these principles is the most important factor in an efficient process control system. 
 
This course is for those individuals primarily involved in achieving effective results for the industrial processes they are responsible for. This would involve the design, specification and implementation of control and measurement equipment. The course focuses on real applications, with attention to special installation considerations and application limitations when selecting or installing different measurement or control equipment.


COURSE OUTLINEMODULE 1: INTRODUCTION, BASIC TERMS AND DEFINITIONS

Basis measurement and control concepts
Basic performance terms and conditions
Advanced performance terms and conditions
Definitions


MODULE 2: DIAGRAMS AND NUMBERING

P & ID symbols
Selection criteria
Typical applications


MODULE 3: PRESSURE MEASUREMENT

Principles of pressure measurement
Pressure sources
Mechanical transducers and elements
Electrical transducers and elements
Installation considerations
Impact on the overall control loop
Selection tables
Future pressure technologies


MODULE 4: LEVEL MEASUREMENT

Principles of level measurement
Simple sight glasses and gauging rods
Buoyancy tape systems
Hydrostatic pressure
Ultrasonic measurement
Radar measurement
Vibration switches
Radiation measurement
Electrical measurement
Density measurement
Future level technologies


MODULE 5: TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

Principles of temperature measurement
Thermocouples
Resistance temperature detectors (RTDs)
Thermistors
Liquid-in-glass, filled and bimetallic
Non-contact pyrometers
Humidity
Installation considerations
Impact on the overall control loop
Selection tables
Future temperature technologies


MODULE 6: FLOW AND MASS MEASUREMENT

Principle of flow measurement
Differential pressure flowmeters
Open channel flow measurement
Variable area flowmeters
Oscillatory flow measurement
Magnetic flow meters
Positive displacement
Ultrasonic flow measurement
Mass flow meters
Installation considerations
Impact on overall control loop
Selection tables


MODULE 7: CONTROL VALVES

Principles of control valves
Sliding stem valves
Rotary valves
Control valve selection and sizing
Control valve characteristics / trim
Control valve noise and cavitation
Actuators and positioners
Valve benchset and stroking
Impact on overall control loop
Selection tables
Future technologies


MODULE 8: BASIC CONTROL PHILOSOPHIES

Open loops
Closed loops
Feed forward and ration control
Feedback control
Overview of different tuning rules available
Cascade control
Good practice in troubleshooting
Adaptive and self tuning controllers


MODULE 9: INTEGRATION OF THE SYSTEM, MODERN TRENDS AND OTHER PROCESS CONSIDERATIONS

Calculation of individual instruments and total error for the system
Selection considerations
Testing and commissioning of subsystems
RS 232, RS 422, RS 423, RS 485, etc.
Fiber optic cables
New smart instruments and fieldbus
Noise and earthing considerations
Materials of construction
Linearisation


MODULE 10: PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS INTRODUCTION TO THE PLC

Digital Input / Output Systems
Analog Input / Output Systems
Fundamentals of PLC Programming


MODULE 11: ISO, HAZOPS, RELIABILITY CENTERED MAINTENANCE, SPARE PARTS ANALYSIS, TESTING AND PANEL DESIGN

ISO 9001:2000 in depth
HAZOP analysis
Reliability centered maintenance and spare parts analysis
Acceptance Testing (FAT and SAT)
Electrical design of assorted panels

 
MODULE 12: HMI, SCADA & DCS SYSTEMS

System Hardware & Software
Components
Design & layout
Alarms & Reporting


NB: The course description of all EIT "Certificate" courses has been changed to "Professional Certificate of Competency". Some course brochures are not yet updated. The actual certificate received by successful students will include the new title.

COURSE FEES

What are the fees for my country?

The Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT) provides distance education to students located almost anywhere in the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. A full list of fees in a currency appropriate for every country would be complex to navigate and, with today’s exchange rate fluctuations, difficult to maintain. Instead we aim to give you a rapid response regarding fees that is customised to your individual circumstances.

We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student commences study. For a rapid reply to your enquiry regarding courses fees and payment options, please enquire via the below button and we will respond within 2 business days.

 

68036| Engineering Institute of Technology| Professional Certificate of Competency in Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) & SCADA Systems|

BY THE END OF THIS 3-MONTH INTERACTIVE LIVE ONLINE COURSE YOU WILL LEARN:

  • The fundamentals of SCADA systems
  • The essentials of SCADA software configuration
  • Tricks and tips in installation of SCADA systems
  • The ssentials of telecommunications links
  • The use of Industrial Ethernet in SCADA systems
  • OPC and SCADA systems
  • SCADA network security issues
  • How to troubleshoot SCADA systems
  • How to specify PLC hardware and installation criteria
  • How to describe PLC software structure
  • How to write medium level PLC programs (using ladderlogic)
  • How to troubleshoot a typical PLC system
  • About specifying PLC systems 

Next intake starts September 07, 2015.

There are limited places available to ensure a superior learning experience for our students.

This is an extremely popular course and it will reach capacity early so do not delay.

Contact us now to find out more and secure your place!

OVERVIEW

This comprehensive course covers the essentials of SCADA and PLC systems, which are often used in close association with each other. A selection of case studies are used to illustrate the key concepts with examples of real world working SCADA and PLC systems in the water, electrical and processing industries.

This course will be an excellent opportunity to network with your peers, as well as to gain significant new information and techniques for your next SCADA / PLC project. Although the emphasis of the course will be on practical industry topics highlighting recent developments, using case studies, the latest application of SCADA, PLC technologies and fundamentals will be covered.

The inevitable question is which PLC is being used. We present this course focusing on the generic PLC and use the open programming IEC 61131-3 standard. For specific examples we use the Allen Bradley range, but are not selling Allen Bradley or for that matter any other PLC! 

This course is designed to benefit you with practical up-to-date information on the application of PLC systems to the automation and process control industries. It is suitable for people who have little or no exposure to PLCs, but expect to become involved in some or all aspects of PLC installation. It aims to give practical advice from experts in the field, to assist you to correctly plan, program and install a PLC with a shorter learning curve and more confidence. While the course is ideal for electricians, technicians and engineers who are new to PLCs, much of the material covered will be of value to those who already have some basic skills, but need a wider perspective for larger and more challenging tasks ahead. The information covered advances from the basics to challenge even the most experienced engineer in the industry today.

NB: The course description of all EIT "Certificate" courses has been changed to "Professional Certificate of Competency". Some course brochures are not yet updated. The actual certificate received by successful students will include the new title.

COURSE OUTLINEMODULE 1: INTRODUCTION

Introduction and brief history of PLCs
Alternative control systems - where do PLCs fit in?
Why PLCs have become so widely accepted
Lingering concerns about PLCs

FUNDAMENTALS OF PLC HARDWARE
Block diagram of typical PLC
PLC processor module - memory organisation
Input and output section - module types
Power supplies


MODULE 2: BACKGROUND TO SCADA

Fundamentals and definition of terms
Comparison of SCADA, DCS, PLC and
Smart instruments
Typical SCADA installations

SCADA SYSTEM HARDWARE
Comparison of SCADA, DCS, PLC and Smart instruments
Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) structure
Analog and digital input/output modules
Application programs
PLCs used as RTUs
Master site structure
Communications architectures
Point-to-point and point-to-multipoint systems
System reliability and availability
Configuration of a master station


MODULE 3: FUNDAMENTALS OF PLC SOFTWARE

Methods of representing Logic, Boolean Algebra, instruction code and graphical presentation
Fundamental ladder logic instruction set
Comparison of different manufacturers, memory and data representation and instruction code

USING LADDER LOGIC FOR SIMPLE DIGITAL FUNCTIONS
The basic rules
Comparison of relay ladder diagrams
The concept of the 'scan' and how to apply it
Infinite fan-out
Contact 'normal' states
Positive and negative logic
Basic Boolean functions
The usefulness of DeMorgan's Law

USING REGISTERS (WORDS)
Number systems, Timers, Types of register data, Counters, Bit shift and rotate, Table functions and Register (Matrix) logic functions


MODULE 4: SCADA SYSTEMS SOFTWARE

Components of a SCADA system
Software - design of SCADA packages
Configuration of SCADA systems
Building the user interface
Connecting to PLCs and other hardware
SCADA system design
The Twelve Golden Rules


MODULE 5: GOOD PROGRAMMING HABITS

Keeping track of addresses and data used
Looking ahead - how will programs be maintained?
Practical methods to improve quality: organisation of code, thorough documentation and simplifying  changes

GOOD INSTALLATION PRACTICE
Location of hardware
Good wiring practice
Cable spacing, power distribution and wire numbering
Reducing noise and interference
Screening and shielding


MODULE 6: HUMAN MACHINE INTERFACES (HMIS)

Human and ergonomic factors
HMI configuration
Design and layout
Alarming and reporting philosophies
Alarm system design

GOOD INSTALLATION PRACTICE
Recommended installation practice
Ergonomic considerations


MODULE 7: ADVANCED CONTROL WITH PLCS

The concept of reusable logic
Examples, drive logic and alarm handling
Use of advanced programming functions
Matrix logic
Table functions and indirect addressing
Example: simple display driver

BATCH PROCESSES AND SEQUENTIAL CONTROL
Remembering the program state
Creating a 'stepper'
Step advance
Fault detection and recovery
Operator intervention
Multiple recipes or alternative paths
Sequential function charts

PID CONTROL
The importance of timing and scan time
When PID is not always appropriate:
- Intermittent measurements
- Long transport delays

SAFETY PROGRAMMABLE SYSTEMS
Why regular PLCs should not be used for safety functions
Programmable electronic logic solvers
Safety certification
Certified programming systems
Application examples
Growth of networked safety devices and certified networks
Integrated safety systems


MODULE 8: LANDLINE MEDIA

Background to cables
Noise and interference on cables
Twisted pair cables and fibre optic cables
Public network provided services

WIDE AREA NETWORK (WAN) TECHNOLOGIES
Digital hierarchies, T1 and E1
Packet switching
Frame relay
ATM
SDH/sonnet

LOCAL AREA NETWORKS (LANs)
Ethernet networks
Industrial Ethernet
TCP/IP
LAN connectivity: bridges, routers and switches
Redundancy options
Web based Industrial SCADA
Wireless
OPC


MODULE 9: INTRODUCTION TO IEC 61131-3

Concepts
Common elements
Programming languages: structured text
Function block diagrams


MODULE 10: SCADA NETWORK SECURITY

Introduction
Authentication and encryption
SCADA firewalls
Firewall architectures and guidelines

TROUBLESHOOTING AND MAINTENANCE
Troubleshooting SCADA systems
Maintenance tasks

SPECIFICATION OF SYSTEMS
Common pitfalls, Standards, Performance criteria, Testing, Documentation and Future trends


MODULE 11: BUILDING A PLC PANEL, AS WELL AS GENERAL COMMISSIONING, TESTING AND UPGRADING

Electrical design and construction
Commissioning and installation
Simulation and testing
Problem isolation and faultfinding
Upgrading of control systems


MODULE 12: INDUSTRIAL COMMUNICATIONS PROTOCOLS

RS-232 interface standard
RS-485 interface standard
Fieldbus
Modbus
DNP3.0

MODEMS
Introduction and principles
Asynchronous/synchronous
Modulation techniques
Error detection and correction
Troubleshooting


NB: The course description of all EIT "Certificate" courses has been changed to "Professional Certificate of Competency". Some course brochures are not yet updated. The actual certificate received by successful students will include the new title.

COURSE FEES

What are the fees for my country?

The Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT) provides distance education to students located all around the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. We aim to give you a rapid response regarding course fees that are relevant to your individual circumstances.

We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student begins to study. For a rapid reply to your query regarding courses fees and payment options, please contact a Course Advisor in your region via the below button and we will respond within two (2) business days.

68035| Engineering Institute of Technology| Professional Certificate of Competency in Control Valve Sizing, Selection and Maintenance|

COURSE OBJECTIVES


By the end of this course you will be able to:

  • Understand what happens inside a control valve from a basic fluid mechanics point of view
  • Appreciate the difference between cavitation and flashing
  • Understand the difference between controlled and choked flow
  • Do simple calculations to determine CV values
  • Recognize severe service applications and have an appreciation for the methods of tackling the problems associated with such applications
  • Identify the different types of control valves commonly in use and understand the relative advantages of each
  • Choose between different characteristics on offer
  • Understand the advantages and disadvantages of different seat leakage rates
  • Size actuators for linear and rotary applications and know the relativeadvantages of pneumatic, hydraulic and electric types
  • Select materials for bodies, trims, packing boxes, and gaskets
  • Use a computer sizing program to assist with the selection of control valves
  • Understand the failure modes for control valves and demonstrate new approaches to trouble shooting

OVERVIEW

Control valves are the workhorse of our facilities, continually functioning to ensure our systems work as intended. A properlyspecified, engineered, designed, installed, and maintained control valve can be one of the most profitable investments a facility can have, while a control valve that "does not work well" can be an increased risk of injury (more exposure of maintenance personnel working on the valve), and disruption to your system.

With today's focus on data management, the control valve is the part of the control loop that not only requires integration with modern data collection methods, but also involves mechanical features (moving parts, exposure to process fluids, material selection issues) as well as occupational health and safety issues not associated with other parts of the control loop (such as noise). Often the benefits of modern SCADA systems can be lost with inappropriate or minimal attention to the control valves.

This comprehensive certificate course covers the essentials of control valves and actuators. With this knowledge, the user is better placed to fully realize the full potential and benefit of any control system.

Selections of case studies are used to illustrate the key concepts with examples of real world working control valves. The course is aimed at those who want to get a solid appreciation of the fundamentals of their control valve design, installation and troubleshooting.


COURSE OUTLINEMODULE 1: INTRODUCTION

Basic concepts
Definitions


MODULE 2: TYPES OF CONTROL VALVES

Linear vs rotary
Discussion of linear valves (globe valves, angle valves, etc)
Discussion of rotary valves (butterfly valves, ball valves, etc)
Discussion of seats and leakage


MODULE 3: BASIC SIZING FOR LIQUIDS

Basic selection steps
Key equations
Interactive use of sizing software


MODULE 4: BASIC SIZING FOR GASES AND VAPOURS

Basic selection steps
Key equations
Interactive use of sizing software


MODULE 5: INHERENT AND INSTALLED FLOW CHARACTERISTICS

Discussion of how the control valve interacts with the system


MODULE 6: ACTUATORS

Principles of actuators for control valves
Pneumatic actuator types


MODULE 7: CAVITATION AND FLASHING

Difference between cavitation and flashing
Managing cavitation


MODULE 8: NOISE PREDICTION AND TREATMENT

Mechanical vibration
Hydrodynamic noise
Aerodynamic noise


MODULE 9: MATERIALS OF CONSTRUCTION

Typical materials of construction for body and valve trim
Recognise issues of corrosion and wear


MODULE 10: MAINTENANCE ISSUES

Understand the tasks involved in valve maintenance
Develop your knowledge of important installation features relevant to good maintenance
Know about methods for detection of backlash and stiction in the valve drive


MODULE 11 & 12: PRINCIPLES OF PRESSURE RELIEF DEVICES AND PRESSURE RELIEVING SYSTEMS

Pressure relieving systems as an independent layer of protection
The risk reduction complemented by a functional safety system
The risk reduction provided by hazardous area protections systems
Fire and gas detection


NB: The course description of all EIT "Certificate" courses has been changed to "Professional Certificate of Competency". Some course brochures are not yet updated. The actual certificate received by successful students will include the new title.

COURSE FEES

What are the fees for my country?

The Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT) provides distance education to students located almost anywhere in the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. A full list of fees in a currency appropriate for every country would be complex to navigate and, with today’s exchange rate fluctuations, difficult to maintain. Instead we aim to give you a rapid response regarding fees that is customised to your individual circumstances.

We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student commences study. For a rapid reply to your enquiry regarding courses fees and payment options, please enquire via the below button and we will respond within 2 business days.

68034| Engineering Institute of Technology| Professional Certificate of Competency in Practical Boiler Control and Instrumentation for Engineers and Technicians|

COURSE OBJECTIVES:


By the end of this course you will learn:

  • Boiler safety control and start-up interlocks
  • Principal boiler control functions
  • Types of boilers in current use
  • Typical boiler control diagrams and their design intentions
  • Hazards associated with boiler systems
  • Principles of open and closed loop/feed forward
  • Setting up and tuning of boiler control loops
  • Safety concepts to identify principles and design
  • Impacts of level, quality and stability in boiler feed water control
  • Impact of pressure and temperature as a means of control
  • Furnace draft measurement and control with protection against implosions
  • Impact of stoichiometric burn ratio and lean air requirements
  • How to improve burner efficiency using control and analysers
  • Distinguish burner rod and ultra violet flame detection
  • Steam demand and firing rate control
  • Main steam and reheat steam temperature control are influenced
  • Flue gas analysis and fuel combustion trimming controls have on the system
  • Advanced control strategies for improved boiler plant efficiency

OVERVIEW

This program introduces the basic practices of controls systems and safety controls for industrial steam generating boilers. It focuses on the control and safety requirements applicable to most types of flame heated boilers from small commercial gas-fired units to large industrial multi-fuel installations.

The program will examine how control and instrumentation is designed to manage the main variables such as drum water level, furnace draft, stoichiometric fuel combustion and air assist conditions. Burner management systems are introduced with their principal features including flame detection, purge, pilot and main burner safety systems during start up and running operations.

The essential safety requirements for boilers and burners are identified and the corresponding safety interlocks with respect to purge, fuel rich, double block and bleed are explained as practical solutions in accordance with the latest safety standards.

 COURSE OUTLINE

MODULE 1: INTRODUCTION
Objectives of boiler controls
Overview of boiler types

MODULE 2: ESSENTIALS OF BOILER PROCESSES
Boiler processes in block diagrams to show key inputs and output variables
Hazards of boiler operations 
The main control functions in boilers and furnaces

MODULE 3: REVIEW OF PROCESS CONTROL 
Principles of sensors and transmitters with examples of boilers
Closed loop control principles including feedback, feedforward, ratio and limiting
Control system hardware and software tools

MODULE 4: INSTRUMENTATION RELEVANT TO BOILERS
Safety instrumented controls and the impact of IEC 61511
Instrumentation diagrams and symbols per ISA and SAMA
Distributed control systems and the separation of safety systems

MODULE 5: FEEDWATER CRITERIA AND DRUM LEVEL CONTROL
Performance requirements: level, quality, stability
Characteristic responses of drum level
Level control solutions, 1, 2 and 3 element types
Level measurement problems and practices
Drum level safety systems

MODULE 6: FURNACE AIR
Performance requirements; pressures and temperatures
Characteristic responses and means of control

MODULE 7: DRAFT CONTROL
Pressure measurement methods and the pressure profile
Temperature control and the impact of dew point
Protection against implosion

MODULE 8: COMBUSTION CONTROLS
The combustion process and its requirements for efficiency and safety
Coal, oil and gas firing types
Stoichiometric air and excess air requirements

MODULE 9: FUEL OPTIMISATION
Fuel-air ratio control and its measurements
Firing rate controls and cross limiters for improving dynamic response
Methods for measurements of boiler efficiency using analysers
Application of optimising controllers

MODULE 10: BURNER MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
Safety and performance requirements of pulverisers, burners and igniters
Furnace safety standards and regulations
Flame monitors and flame failure detection
Start up protection and sequencing
Furnace supervisory controls and shutdown systems

MODULE 11: STEAM TEMPERATURE CONTROL
Superheater and attemperator arrangements
Essential control requirements
De-superheater controls

MODULE 12: STEAM PRESSURE AND BOILER LOAD CONTROLS
Pressure and flow response characteristics
Single boiler load control
Multiple boiler installations and load sharing controls 

COURSE FEES

What are the fees for my country?

The Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT) provides distance education to students located almost anywhere in the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. A full list of fees in a currency appropriate for every country would be complex to navigate and, with today’s exchange rate fluctuations, difficult to maintain. Instead we aim to give you a rapid response regarding fees that is customised to your individual circumstances.

We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student commences study. For a rapid reply to your enquiry regarding courses fees and payment options, please enquire via the below button and we will respond within 2 business days.

68033| Engineering Institute of Technology| Professional Certificate of Competency in Safety Instrumentation Systems for Process Industries|

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

After completing this course, you will understand:

  • Fundamentals of risk assessment and the role of safety regulations
  • Process hazard study methods including HAZOP
  • Principles of risk reduction by Safety Instrumented Systems (SIS)
  • The differences between a basic control system and an SIS
  • The roles of standards IEC 61508 and IEC 61511
  • The principles and application of the safety life cycle for project management
  • The meaning and implications of Safety Integrity Levels (SILs)
  • How to use fault tree analysis to predict accident rates and failure rates
  • How SIL targets are determined
  • The role of alarms in safety critical applications
  • How to design the SIS to meet IEC requirements for SIL targets
  • Key features of safety certified PLCs
  • Understand failure modes and the concepts of fault tolerance
  • How to calculate failure probabilities for single and redundant SIS designs
  • How to select instruments and controllers suitable for safety systems
  • How to manage the application software project for your safety system
  • Methods for avoidance of spurious trips
  • How to optimise proof testing intervals  

OVERVIEW

This course is for engineers and technicians who wish to develop their knowledge of the design and implementation of safety instrumented systems as applied to industrial processes. Safety control systems are widely used in hazardous processes to protect people, the environment and equipment against serious harm. Many countries look for compliance to international standards IEC 61508 and IEC 61511 as a benchmark of acceptable quality in design and management of safety controls.

This course will explain the key requirements of the IEC 61511 standard for all stages of the safety project from hazard and risk assessment studies through to hardware and software engineering and on to the maintenance and proof testing regimes. Practical examples and discussions will assist you to develop your skills in this most important aspect of instrument engineering.


COURSE OUTLINEMODULE 1: OVERVIEW OF SAFETY INSTRUMENTED SYSTEMS

Safety system basics with an example SIS
Hazards, risks and risk reduction
Principles of safety management
Functional safety standards IEC 61508/61511
Setting SIL targets
Designing to meet SIL targets
Cost of ownership


MODULE 2: SAFETY LIFE CYCLE MODELS

Purpose of life cycle models
IEC 61511 requirements
Step by step activities


MODULE 3: HAZARD STUDY METHODS

Hazard studies and project stages
Hazard identification methods
HAZOP method
Developing SIS requirements
Fault tree analysis


MODULE 4: RISK REDUCTION BY SIS

Deciding risk targets
Principle of ALARP and tolerable risk
Layers of protection and role of alarms
Risk reduction models
Preparing a safety requirements Specification


MODULE 5: SIL DETERMINATION METHODS

Quantitative and risk matrix methods
Risk graphs
Layers of protection analysis
Practical examples


MODULE 6: DESIGNING SIS STRUCTURES

Design procedure steps
IEC 61511 guidelines
Architectures and fault tolerance
Choosing the right structures for the job


MODULE 7: SELECTING INSTRUMENTS FOR SAFETY DUTIES

Switches versus transmitters
Failure modes of sensors and actuators
Minimising dangerous failures
Qualification by design and certification
Qualification by prior use
Smart instruments and diagnostic
Coverage


MODULE 8: RELIABILITY ANALYSIS

Purposes of reliability calculations
SIS failure modes, safe and dangerous
Formulae and how to use them
Worked examples
Obtaining reliability data and the
problems
Review of software tools


MODULE 9: SAFETY-CERTIFIED PLCS

Logic solvers, old and new
Development of safety PLCs
Hardware and software features
Review of industry types
Communications and networking
Integrated basic and safety control


MODULE 10: APPLICATION SOFTWARE FOR SAFETY DUTIES

The problem with software
IEC software life cycle models
Application software steps
Factory acceptance testing
Quality assurance and certification


MODULE 11: DOCUMENTATION AND MANAGEMENT

Documents needed for the SIS project
Verification and validation
Operations
Management of change


MODULE 12: DIAGNOSTICS AND PROOF TESTING

Proof testing and why it is needed
Testing of sensors
Partial closure testing of valves
Optimising the proof test interval


NB: The course description of all EIT "Certificate" courses has been changed to "Professional Certificate of Competency". Some course brochures are not yet updated. The actual certificate received by successful students will include the new title.

 

COURSE FEES

What are the fees for my country?

The Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT) provides distance education to students located almost anywhere in the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. A full list of fees in a currency appropriate for every country would be complex to navigate and, with today’s exchange rate fluctuations, difficult to maintain. Instead we aim to give you a rapid response regarding fees that is customised to your individual circumstances.

We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student commences study. For a rapid reply to your enquiry regarding courses fees and payment options, please enquire via the below button and we will respond within 2 business days.

68032| Engineering Institute of Technology| Professional Certificate of Competency in Allen Bradley Controllogix/ Logix5000 PLC Platforms|

COURSE OBJECTIVES

 At the end of this course you will be able to:

  • Understand the basics of control systems and PLC processors
  • Operate and navigate RSLogix 5000 software and associated platforms
  • Use ladder logic programming
  • Create and modify a project
  • Use PLC hardware such as I/O modules
  • Communicate across networks
  • Make design considerations
  • Make maintenance and troubleshooting considerations
  • Gain knowledge on an introduction to structured text and Sequential Function Charts (SFCs)
  • Gain knowledge on an introduction to function block diagrams
  • Understand fault finding techniques

Next intake scheduled for June 8, 2015 - contact us now to secure your place!

 

OVERVIEW

This program concentrates on Rockwell RSLogix5000 and the platforms using this software. It is a practical program designed to give students the tools necessary to confidently create and program projects, focussing on design, implementation and maintenance. It commences with an explanation of the basics of control systems, why we use them and the various practical aspects of a Rockwell PLC. Various programming techniques, fault finding and correcting faults are also covered in detail.

The course is presented via live, interactive e-learning webinars. There will be set assignments throughout, focussing on the practical aspects of PLCs which are necessary for true design, configuration, implementation and maintenance to take place.

NB: The course description of all EIT "Certificate" courses has been changed to "Professional Certificate of Competency". Some course brochures are not yet updated. The actual certificate received by successful students will include the new title.

COURSE OUTLINEMODULE 1: BASIC UNDERSTANDING OF CONTROL SYSTEMS AND LOGIX5000

  • Understanding control systems
  • How a PLC works and why we use them
  • Drafting basic ladder logic for a RSLogix 5000ladder routine
  • Operating and navigating RSLogix 5000 software

MODULE 2: GETTING STARTED WITH PROJECT CREATION AND MODIFICATION

  • Fundamentals and definition of terms
  • Creating and modifying a RSLogix 5000 project
  • Relationship between the binary, decimal and hexadecimal numbering systems
  • Creating tags and monitoring data in a RSLogix 5000 project
  • The difference between tags and addresses

MODULE 3: ORGANISING DATA AND BASIC LADDER LOGIC DESIGN AND RULES

  • Drafting basic ladder logic for a RSLogix 5000 ladder routine
  • Selecting and entering basic ladder logic instructions for a RSLogix 5000 routine
  • Organizing data
  • Tasks, programs and routines
  • Tag arrays

MODULE 4: HARDWARE IDENTIFICATION AND MODULE SELECTION AND CONFIGURATION

  • Hardware of the different platforms, chassis, controllers, I/O modules and communication modules
  • Configuring Controllogix digital I/O modules
  • Configuring Controllogix analog I/O modules

MODULE 5: LADDER PROGRAMMING USING MORE ADVANCED INSTRUCTION TYPES

  • Ladder programming using more advanced instruction types
  • Using expressions
  • Programming a procedures
  • Retrieving and setting controller status values with GSV/SSV instructions
  • Programming a BTD instruction

MODULE 6: USING SPECIALIZED INSTRUCTIONS AND COMMUNICATION

  • Configuring a message instruction
  • Programming program control instructions
  • Creating user defined data types
  • Using RSlinx for controller to computer communication

MODULE 7: DOCUMENTING AND SEARCHING A PROJECT AND SHARING DATA OVER A NETWORK

  • Searching for project components
  • Documenting a project
  • Configuring Logix5000 controllers to share data over an Ethernet/IP network
  • Communicating with an I/O Module over an Ethernet/IP network

MODULE 8: FAULT FINDING TECHNIQUES

  • Forcing I/O tags and toggling bits
  • Analysing and troubleshooting a system using a trend chart
  • Analysing and correcting controller faults
  • Analysing and correcting I/O faults
  • Chassis and power supply problem

MODULE 9: CREATING AN A DD-ON INSTRUCTION AND ONLINE ACTIONS

  • Entering and editing ladder logic online
  • Developing an add-on instruction in a ladder diagram
  • Managing RSLogix 5000 project files

MODULE 10: THE NETLINX PHILOSOPHY AND EARTHING CONSIDERATIONS

  • The 3 major industrial networks used by Controllogix
  • The network topologies explained
  • Installation considerations including earthing and power supplies

MODULE 11: FIRMWARE UPGRADE AND SETTING UP COMMUNICATION MODULES

  • Updating Logix5000 Firmware using Controlflash
  • Setting up communication modules
  • Introduction to BootP server

MODULE 12: INTRODUCTION TO OTHER PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES

  • Introduction and creation of a function block diagram
  • Introduction and creation of a structured text routine
  • Introduction and creation of a sequential function chart


NB: The course description of all EIT "Certificate" courses has been changed to "Professional Certificate of Competency". Some course brochures are not yet updated. The actual certificate received by successful students will include the new title.

 

COURSE FEES

What are the fees for my country?

The Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT) provides distance education to students located almost anywhere in the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. A full list of fees in a currency appropriate for every country would be complex to navigate and, with today’s exchange rate fluctuations, difficult to maintain. Instead we aim to give you a rapid response regarding fees that is customised to your individual circumstances.

We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student commences study. For a rapid reply to your enquiry regarding courses fees and payment options, please enquire via the below button and we will respond within 2 business days

68029| Engineering Institute of Technology| Professional Certificate of Competency in Modern SCADA Communication Systems including DNP3 & IEC60870|

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN

  • The fundamentals of SCADA systems
  • SCADA protocols and how they should be structured and applied
  • "Best practice" decisions on the best and most cost effective use of SCADA open protocols for your company
  • The best current practice for data communications for SCADA systems, including LAN and WAN based systems
  • DNP3 protocol
  • DNP3 protocol to your next SCADA project
  • DNP3 interoperability issues
  • The "nuts and bolts" about selecting DNP3 based systems
  • Troubleshooting simple problems with the DNP3 protocol
  • The fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 protocols
  • How IEC 61850 is structured 
     

Next intake is scheduled for September 14, 2015 - contact us to apply.

This course is also available to students resident in India. Please click here for information and fees for Indian students.

OVERVIEW

This course covers the essential elements of SCADA systems with particular emphasis on the DNP3 protocol, with an overview of the IEC 60870.5 and IEC 61850 protocols as well as new developments in this area.

The course commences with a review of the fundamentals of SCADA systems hardware, software and the communications systems that connect the outstations to the SCADA Master control station. The R S-232 and RS-485 interface standards are reviewed, along with MODBUS, Ethernet and TCP/IP protocols. The application of both Local Area and Wide Area networks for SCADA system communications is also covered. A detailed explanation of the DNP3 protocol is given, where the features, message structure, practical benefits and applications are discussed. The course is intended to be product independent but examples will be taken from existing products to ensure that all aspects of the DNP3 protocols are covered.

Examples are given of the configuration issues for DNP3 operation over both low speed serial (eg Radio links) and high speed LAN and WAN networks. An overview of the IEC 60870.5 and IEC 61850 protocols and their areas of application is given as well as new developments in this area. The application of Fieldbus protocols in SCADA systems is also covered. This course provides you with the tools to design your next SCADA system more effectively using DNP3 to draw on the latest technologies.

 COURSE OUTLINEMODULE 1: INTRODUCTION

Overview
SCADA systems
Open systems and communications standards
MODBUS and DNP3
Local Area Networks, Ethernet and TCP/IP
IEC 60870-5
IEC 61850 protocol
Open SCADA Protocols
Interoperability and open standards
Development of standards

MODULE 2: FUNDAMENTALS OF SCADA SYSTEMS

SCADA systems
Remote terminal units
PLCs used as R TUs
The master station
Communication architectures
Communication philosophies

MODULE 3: ADVANCED CONSIDERATION OF DNP

Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model
Basic interface standards: R S-232 and R S-485
MO DBUS protocol
Preview of DNP3
What is DNP3?
Interoperability and open standard
Benefits of DNP3
Features of DNP3
System topology
Background and development
Why use DNP3?

MODULE 4: FUNDAMENTALS OF DISTRIBUTED NETWORK PROTOCOL (DNP3)

Fundamental concepts
Understanding DNP message structure
Physical layer
Datalink layer
Transport layer (Pseudo- transport)

MODULE 5: WIDE AREA SCADA NETWORKS AND OVERVIEW OF IEC60870-5 PROTOCOLS

Application layer message handling
Application layer message functions
Data object library
DNP message decoding

MODULE 6: ADVANCED CONSIDERATIONS OF DNP

DNP subset definitions
Interoperability between DNP devices
Implementation rules and recommendations
Conformance testing
DNP polling and communications options
Time synchronisation

MODULE 7: CONFIGURATION OF DNP OVER SERIAL LINKS

Configuration issues
Water industry example

MODULE 8: REVIEW OF ETHERNET AND TCP/ IP PROTOCOLS

IEEE 802.3 CSMA/CD ("Ethernet")
Physical layers
Medium access control
Half-duplex
Full duplex
Switched Ethernet
Internet Protocol (IP)
Transmission Control Protocol (TCP)
User Datagram Protocol (UDP)

MODULE 9: WIDE AREA SCADA NETWORKS

Routers
WAN technologies
DNP3 over TCP/IP and U DP/IP
Configuration of DNP over WAN
Power industry example

MODULE 10: OVERVIEW OF IEC 60870-5 PROTOCOLS

Overview of IEC 60870-5 Protocols
Standards
System topology
Message structure
Addressing
Networked version
Application data objects
Interoperability
Network operation
Differences between DNP3 and
IEC 60870 Protocols

MODULE 11: INTELLIGENT ELECTRONIC DEVICES (IEDS) AND IEC 61850

IEDs definition
IEDs functions
IEC 61850 Protocol Overview
IEC 61850 technology
Substation automation example


MODULE 12: FIELDBUS AND SCADA COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS

Introduction
Profibus
Foundation fieldbus
Latest Developments in Technology

 

COURSE FEES

What are the fees for my country?

The Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT) provides distance education to students located almost anywhere in the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. A full list of fees in a currency appropriate for every country would be complex to navigate and, with today’s exchange rate fluctuations, difficult to maintain. Instead we aim to give you a rapid response regarding fees that is customised to your individual circumstances.

We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student commences study. For a rapid reply to your enquiry regarding courses fees and payment options, please enquire via the below button and we will respond within 2 business days.

68028| Engineering Institute of Technology| Cybersecurity for Automation, Control, and SCADA Systems|

YOU WILL LEARN:

  • The principles behind creating an effective long term program security
  • How to interpret the ANSI/ISA99 industrial security guidelines and apply them to your operation
  • The basics of risk and vulnerability analysis methodologies
  • The principles of security policy development
  • The concepts of defence in depth and zone/conduit models of security
  • Current trends in industrial security incidents and methods hackers use to attack a system
  • The principles behind the key risk mitigation techniques, including anti-virus and patch management, firewalls, and virtual private networks

Next intake is scheduled for July 13, 2015.  Limited places available.

Contact us now to obtain course details and fees and to secure your place.

Payment is not required until two weeks before the start of the course

OVERVIEW

The move to using open standards such as Ethernet, TCP/IP, and web technologies in supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) and process control networks has begun to expose these systems to the same cyberattacks that have wreaked so much havoc on corporate information systems. This course provides a detailed look at how the ANSI/ISA99 standards can be used to protect your critical control systems. It also explores the procedural and technical differences between the security for traditional IT environments and those solutions appropriate for SCADA or plant floor environments. This course will assist managers, system operators and industrial data communications specialists in setting up secure systems.

Topics covered include: introduction and terminology; electronic security; threat sources; understanding the current industrial security environment; how cyberattacks happen; creating a security program; risk analysis; addressing risk with security policy, organization, and awareness; addressing risk with selected security counter measures; addressing risk with implementation measures; monitoring and improving the CSMS.

If you are using any form of communication system, this course will give you the essential tools in securing and protecting your industrial networks whether they be automation, process control, PLC or SCADA based.

Exercises include:

  • Develop a business case for industrial security
  • Conduct security threat analysis
  • Investigate scanning and protocol analysis tools
  • Apply basic security analysis tools software

 

ISA Standards to be reviewed:

  • ANSI/ISA-62443-1-1 (ANSI/ISA-99.00.01-2007) - Security for Industrial Automation and Control Systems Part 1: Terminology, Concepts & Models
  • ANSI/ISA-62443-2-1 (ANSI/ISA-99.02.01-2009)  - Security for Industrial Automation and Control Systems: Establishing an Industrial Automation and Control Systems Security Program
  • ANSI/ISA-62443-3-3  - Security for industrial automation and control systems: System security requirements and security levels

This course is required for the ISA99/IEC 62443 Cybersecurity Fundamentals Specialist Certificate Program.

Anyone who will be designing, installing and commissioning, maintaining, securing and troubleshooting industrial networked sites will benefit, including:

  • Design engineers
  • Instrumentation engineers
  • Technicians

         

  • Electrical engineers
  • Network engineers

         

  • Engineering managers
  • Network system administrators

 

COURSE OUTLINEMODULE 1: INTRODUCTION (PART 1)

Overview of basic concepts
Concepts of physical, operational and electronic security


MODULE 2: INTRODUCTION (PART 2)

Defining Cyber Security 
Relative to industrial automation
Relative to control systems


MODULE 3: TERMINOLOGY, CONCEPTS, MODELS AND METRICS (PART 1)

IEC/TS 62443-1-1
Terminology


MODULE 4: TERMINOLOGY, CONCEPTS, MODELS AND METRICS (PART 2)

Concepts and models:

Basis for the ISA99 series of standards
Practices
Technical reports

Current industrial security environment


MODULE 5: NETWORKING BASICS

Network Basics
Network types
ISO/OSI reference models
IP addressing and IT versus Industrial Control System differences


MODULE 6: INDUSTRIAL NETWORKING AND NETWORK SECURITY BASICS

Investigate and study address security
Firewalls
Segmentation
Encryption
Secure protocols
Intrusion detection


MODULE 7: ICS SECURITY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM (PART 1)

Creating an ICS Security Management Program 
ISA-62443-2-1
How to create a security program for control systems


MODULE 8: ICS SECURITY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM (PART 2)

Cyber Security Management System (CSMS)
Elements and requirements:

Risk Analysis
Addressing the risk with CSMS
Monitoring and improving the CSMS


MODULE 9: DESIGNING / VALIDATING SECURE SYSTEMS (PART 1)

How to apply security levels
Security lifecycle
Identify risks and significance
Qualitative/quantitative risks


MODULE 10: DESIGNING / VALIDATING SECURE SYSTEMS (PART 2)

Risk assessments
Identifying threats
Security level (SL) definitions


MODULE 11: DEVELOPING SECURE PRODUCTS AND SYSTEMS

Software Security Assurance (SSA)
Control system security layers of responsibility
Incorporating security


MODULE 12: CONCLUSION

Integration of security at the various phases of the development lifecycle
ISA Security Compliance Institute (ICSI)
ISASecure Certification

COURSE FEES

What are the fees for my country?

The Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT) provides distance education to students located almost anywhere in the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. A full list of fees in a currency appropriate for every country would be complex to navigate and, with today’s exchange rate fluctuations, difficult to maintain. Instead we aim to give you a rapid response regarding fees that is customised to your individual circumstances.

We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student commences study. For a rapid reply to your enquiry regarding courses fees and payment options, please enquire via the below button and we will respond within 2 business days.

68024| University of Birmingham| Haemostasis and Thrombosis 2015|

Join us for this year's joint societies meeting of Anticoagulation in Practice, The British Society of Haemostasis and Thrombosis and UK NEQAS for blood coagulation. Key note speakers are Dr J Beyer-Westendorf, Dr M Makris anf Dr T Baglin and there will be a wide selection of small panel sessions as well as an extensive exhibition. On the Friday the BSHT Young Scientist Award will be presented.

Non BSHT members £150 (before 15th September)
BSHT members £125 (before 15th September)
Trainees £125 (before 15th September)
Day delegate rate: £80
Conference dinner: £30
Patients: £10 

68013| Multiple Locations| Oral Anticoagulation Management|

Oral Anticoagulation Management

The course aims to enable autonomous practice in dealing with fundamental and more complex problems of oral anticoagulation management. 

This course consists of pre course learning, 3 days of lectures, seminars, facilitated group discussions and practical workshops. To achieve full accreditation it is necessary to successfully undertake both written and practical assessments on Day 3. The 20 credit module also includes a clinical summative assessment within anticoagulation management clinics in the six months following course attendance. The 10 credit module does not involve any clinical practice and is therefore available to international students unable to practice within the UK.

Learning outcomes

  • An understanding of the theory underpinning anticoagulation management
  • An understanding of the pharmacology of vitamin K antagonists and the relevant medication, side effects, antidotes, interactions and dosing
  • A knowledge of the management of anticoagulation and prevention of complications on the basis of current guidelines and existing research evidence
  • An understanding of the roles of the multi professional disciplinary team in managing anticoagulation safely
  • An understanding of the requirements of clinical governance for anticoagulation management developing / adapting and applying audit tools with performance indicators

 

 

68014| Multiple Locations| Oral Anticoagulation Management|

Oral Anticoagulation Management

The course aims to enable autonomous practice in dealing with fundamental and more complex problems of oral anticoagulation management. 

This course consists of pre course learning, 3 days of lectures, seminars, facilitated group discussions and practical workshops. To achieve full accreditation it is necessary to successfully undertake both written and practical assessments on Day 3. The 20 credit module also includes a clinical summative assessment within anticoagulation management clinics in the six months following course attendance. The 10 credit module does not involve any clinical practice and is therefore available to international students unable to practice within the UK.

Learning outcomes

  • An understanding of the theory underpinning anticoagulation management
  • An understanding of the pharmacology of vitamin K antagonists and the relevant medication, side effects, antidotes, interactions and dosing
  • A knowledge of the management of anticoagulation and prevention of complications on the basis of current guidelines and existing research evidence
  • An understanding of the roles of the multi professional disciplinary team in managing anticoagulation safely
  • An understanding of the requirements of clinical governance for anticoagulation management developing / adapting and applying audit tools with performance indicators

 

 

68015| Multiple Locations| Oral Anticoagulation Management|

Oral Anticoagulation Management

The course aims to enable autonomous practice in dealing with fundamental and more complex problems of oral anticoagulation management. 

This course consists of pre course learning, 3 days of lectures, seminars, facilitated group discussions and practical workshops. To achieve full accreditation it is necessary to successfully undertake both written and practical assessments on Day 3. The 20 credit module also includes a clinical summative assessment within anticoagulation management clinics in the six months following course attendance. The 10 credit module does not involve any clinical practice and is therefore available to international students unable to practice within the UK.

Learning outcomes

  • An understanding of the theory underpinning anticoagulation management
  • An understanding of the pharmacology of vitamin K antagonists and the relevant medication, side effects, antidotes, interactions and dosing
  • A knowledge of the management of anticoagulation and prevention of complications on the basis of current guidelines and existing research evidence
  • An understanding of the roles of the multi professional disciplinary team in managing anticoagulation safely
  • An understanding of the requirements of clinical governance for anticoagulation management developing / adapting and applying audit tools with performance indicators

 

 

68016| Multiple Locations| Oral Anticoagulation Management|

Oral Anticoagulation Management

The course aims to enable autonomous practice in dealing with fundamental and more complex problems of oral anticoagulation management. 

This course consists of pre course learning, 3 days of lectures, seminars, facilitated group discussions and practical workshops. To achieve full accreditation it is necessary to successfully undertake both written and practical assessments on Day 3. The 20 credit module also includes a clinical summative assessment within anticoagulation management clinics in the six months following course attendance. The 10 credit module does not involve any clinical practice and is therefore available to international students unable to practice within the UK.

Learning outcomes

  • An understanding of the theory underpinning anticoagulation management
  • An understanding of the pharmacology of vitamin K antagonists and the relevant medication, side effects, antidotes, interactions and dosing
  • A knowledge of the management of anticoagulation and prevention of complications on the basis of current guidelines and existing research evidence
  • An understanding of the roles of the multi professional disciplinary team in managing anticoagulation safely
  • An understanding of the requirements of clinical governance for anticoagulation management developing / adapting and applying audit tools with performance indicators

 

 

68012| Let Me Play Training and Education Academy| Level 3 Certificate in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education and School Sport (QCF)|

Qualification - Level 3 Certificate in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education and School Sport (QCF)

Limited Places - Introductory Offer £699, normally £850

Course Overview

This qualification supports the achievement of the Government’s school sport policy and lasting legacy of the 2012 Games, and has been developed in partnership with AfPE (Association for Physical Education). It qualifies you to deliver/support the delivery of low risk activities that contribute to a physical education and school sport programme through curriculum-based and/or extra-curricular activities. The course prepares you for employment in a school sport setting, providing an introduction to opportunities for you to work as a physical education and school sport professional.

Who is the course for?

  • Sports coaches, volunteers or leaders

  • Teaching assistants

  • High level teaching assistants

  • Anyone working in schools supporting curriculum time PE and Sport

What units will you study?

  • Communications and professional relationships with children, young people and adults

  • Schools as organisations

  • Understand child and young person development

  • Understand how to safeguard the wellbeing of children and young people

  • Plan physical education and school sport programmes

  • Deliver physical education and school sport programmes

  • Review the delivery of a physical education and school sport programme

Entry requirements

  • Learners are required to be 16 years old or over and hold a Level 2 physical education or sport related qualification, examples below:-

  • 1st4Sport – Level 2 Certificate in supporting learning in physical education and school sport

  • GCSE in physical education, grades A-C

  • Level 2 National Governing Body of sports coaching qualification

  • Level 2 BTEC in sport

  • Level 2 qualification in sports/activity leadership

  • 1st4Sport recognised equivalent

How will the course be delivered and assessed?

The course will be delivered through a minimum of 10 delivery days interspersed with placements in schools/education centres. Delivery will consist of a mixture of theory and practical sessions with distance learning resources to complete your portfolio. The practical assessments will take place during your school placements.

How to apply

To register your interest please go to http://www.lmpcareers-site.com/cpd-training-listing-page/ or for further information call 020 3475 7511.

Progression upon course completion

The additional benefits upon completing this qualification can help learners work towards becoming a TA. The course provides a platform for the learner to continue their CPD and look to achieve the Level 3 Award in supporting teaching and learning in schools (QCF).

Additional Courses with Let Me Play

- Level 2 Certificate in Fitness Instructing (Health related exercise and physical activity for children) Dates: Saturday 4th July 2015
Price: £599

- Level 3 Award in Education and Training (QCF) Date: Immediate Enrolment available Price: £399

Visit www.letmeplay.co.uk

68011| University of Birmingham| Management of Common Headache Disorders in Primary Care|

Management of Common Headache Disorders in Primary Care

Course Summary

This one day course aims to provide an evidence based approach to the challenges of diagnosis and management of headaches. It provides a unique opportunity to interact with the experts on a wide range of causes of headache.

Learning Objectives

  • An understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of migraine, tension-type headache and medication overuse headache
  • How to investigate and when to refer headache disorders
  • An understanding of how to recognise rarer headache disorders and knowledge of how they are treated

Speakers

Professor Carl E Clarke – Professor of Clinical Neurology, UoB & Honorary Consultant Neurologist, Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS trust

Dr Alexandra Sinclair – NIHR Clinician Scientist, UoB & Consultant Neurologist UHB

Sister Julie Edwards – Clinical Nurse Specialist for Headaches, Sandwell & West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust


To register for this course or for further information please contact Jessica Dalton

Jessica Dalton

Tel: 0121 414 2677

Email: j.a.dalton@bham.ac.uk

68010| University of Birmingham| Management of Gynaecology in the Communtty|

Management of Gynaecology in the Community

This module is aimed at general practitioners and practice nurses working in the community required to develop competencies in the management of gynaecological disorders to an advanced level.

The module will provide accredited certification and validation of competencies including skills to enable autonomous practice in dealing with more complex problems and the ability to critically evaluate current research in the field of gynaecology.

The module will comprise:

1. Pre contact reading demonstrating how evidence based practice is implemented effectively in practice and preparation of community based cases.

2. Three days contact time involving lectures and seminars and interactive, facilitated sessions to discuss the key theoretical and clinical aspects of gynaecology management. Students will contribute to discussion, analysis and application of the theoretical perspectives that underpin practice involving critical evaluation of current research.

3. A minimum of 10 sessions within community and/or hospital based clinics to provide opportunities for experience in required practical competencies and to allow students to acquire and demonstrate skills.

4. Course work, written and practical assessment

Learning outcomes

1. Demonstrate a conceptual and systematic understanding of the theory and demonstrate ability to deal with complex issues underpinning gynaecological disease, prevention and management in the community.

2. Demonstrate knowledge of the aetiology, pathophysiology and presentation of gynaecological disorders and the diagnosis and classification of gynaecological disorders based on current information

3. Evaluate critically the management of gynaecological disease and prevention of long term complications according to current guidelines

4. Explain the roles of the multidisciplinary team in gynaecological disease care to improve health outcomes (as recommended in relevant national policy documents)

5. Manage gynaecological disorders in the community safely and effectively using the practical competencies acquired, systematically dealing with complex issues.

6. Demonstrate an understanding of the requirements of clinical governance for gynaecological conditions, their management, developing audit tools and performance indicators to ensure services are being delivered to an acceptable standard; identifying gaps in knowledge or standards and, if necessary, establishing techniques for implementing changes to practice.

7. Understand the requirements for supporting GP practices and primary care services in the management of gynaecological conditions through education.

 


 

For more information about the above course or MSc Clinical Primary and Community Care please contact Amy Partleton on the details below.

Amy Partleton

 

Tel: 0121 414 2677

Email: a.partleton@bham.ac.uk

 

 

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